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Book: Aldean Learns to Make Flutes: A Story About a White Mesa Ute Boy
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Public Domain
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In traditional Ute culture, the flute was used for healing ceremonies, or sometimes for courting. A man would play a song to win the heart of a woman. According to tradition, only she could hear the music being played for her. The White Mesa Utes, located in White Mesa, Utah, are members of the Ute Mountain Ute tribe. The Ute Mountain Ute tribal headquarters are located about 90 miles east, in Towoac, Colorado. This Ute Mountain Ute booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
Aldean "Lightning Hawk" Ketchum
Merry M. Palmer
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: Aldean and the Red-tailed Hawk: A Story About a White Mesa Ute Boy
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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The Ute people have a close association with nature and a respect for all living things. They share the earth with animals, and they look to them for guidance. The Utes honor the hawk in ceremonies, and they use hawk feathers in their regalia. This Ute Mountain Ute booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
Aldean "Lightning Hawk" Ketchum
Merry M. Palmer
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: Cottontail Shoots the Sun: A Uintah/Ouray Ute Tale
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

To the Ute people, the bear, quee yahgudt, is a sacred animal. He gave the Ute people their Bear Dance, which is held in the springtime after the first thunder. This Ute (Uintah/Ouray) booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
LeeAnn Parker
Molly Trainor
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: Cottontail Tames Wood, Water and Rock: A Uintah/Ouray Ute Tale
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
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The cottontail rabbit was very important to the Ute people in days gone by. It provided delicious meals and its soft fur was used for many things. The fur pelts were used to line cradleboards and moccasins, and the pelts were also sewn together to make blankets and robes. This Ute (Uintah/Ouray) booklet story booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
LeeAnn Parker
Molly Trainor
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: Coyote and Bobcat: A Ute Mountain Ute Tale
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

Stories with morals, like "Coyote and Bobcat," were often used by the Ute Mountain Ute people to teach their children about proper behavior and the consequences of their own actions. Coyote tales are only told during the winter time. This Ute Mountain Ute story booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
Aldean "Lightning Hawk" Ketchum
Merry M. Palmer
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: Coyote and the Buffalo: A Uintah/Ouray Ute Tale
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

The buffalo was a giver of life to the Ute people. It is a sacred animal and part of the circle of life. Every part of the buffalo was used; nothing was wasted. For example, the hides were used for blankets and for covering the teepee and sweat lodge. The hooves were used for making utensils. When the Utes first encountered African Americans, they referred to them as "buffalo people,: because their curly hair resembled the curly hair on the mane of the buffalo. According to Ute tradition, Coyote stories should only be told during the winter time. This Ute (Uintah/Ouray) booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
LeeAnn Parker
Molly Trainor
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: Legend of the Sleeping Ute: A Ute Mountain Ute Tale
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

The Ute Mountain Ute people live in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado, near the base of Wisuv Káruv, or Sleeping Ute Mountain. The Ute Mountain Ute tribal headquarters are located at Towaoc, Colorado. The Ute Mountain Ute Sun Dance is held there every year on Sleeping Ute Mountain. This Ute Mountain Ute booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
Curtis Yanito
Merry M. Palmer
Russell Lopez
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: The Creator and Coyote: A Ute Mountain Ute Tale
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

Coyote is a trickster. He tries to trick the people, but they already know what he is capable of doing and how far he will go to get his way. He has a bag full of tricks. This story should only be told during the winter months. This Ute Mountain Ute story booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
Curtis Yanito
Merry M. Palmer
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: The Eye Juggler Coyote: A Uintah/Ouray Ute Tale
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

When the earth was new, there were no people, only the animals. The animals had human characteristics, and they were able to speak to one another. Coyote was often the trickster and had to learn the hard way. The Ute people tell stories about Coyote and other animals to their children. Based on Coyote's mistakes, the elders teach children about proper behavior and positive attitudes. The lessons learned help them avoid making the same mistakes Coyote did and suffering the consequences in their own lives. This Ute(Uintah/Ouray) story booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
LeeAnn Parker
Molly Trainor
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: Why Buzzard Is a Loner: A Uintah/Ouray Ute Tale
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

Just as the birds in this story held a council meeting to decide how to deal with Buzzard, Ute people, to this day, have council meetings to discuss problems and solutions for their people. At these meetings, everyone has the right to express his or her opinion and be heard and listened to. Although some Native American Indian stories can only be told during the winter time, this story can be told any time of the year. This Ute (Uintah/Ouray) booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
LeeAnn Parker
Molly Trainor
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Cottontail Shoots the Sun
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
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This lesson enhances vocabulary acquisition and learning about how the Earth rotates on its axis and revolves around the Sun by reading the story, "Cottontail Shoots the Sun," a traditional tale shared by the Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah and Ouray Reservation. It also helps students become familiar with cultural storytelling and its importance in Native cultures. Students will have a brief introduction to the Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah and Ouray Reservation, its location, and partnership with the University of Utah. Then students will particpate in the group reading of the book and a STEM lesson learning about observable patterns in the sky. 

Subject:
Elementary English Language Arts
History
Literature
Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
Brenda Beyal
Date Added:
09/26/2022
Cottontail Tames Wood, Water, and Rock
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson shares a Ute tale with students to help them to use illustrations to help clarify text details and sequence. The story is then used to help engage students in a discussion on bullying, how actions have consequences and what the characteristics are of a good friend.Background information gives teachers resources to help their students learn more about the Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah and Ouray Reservation. The lesson is an integrated English Language Arts, Social Studies, Health lesson. 

Subject:
Elementary English Language Arts
Health Education
Literature
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson
Reading
Author:
Brenda Beyal
Lorna Loy
Date Added:
03/22/2022
Coyote Loses His Eyes
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

According to Goshute and Ute tradition, Coyote tales should only be told during the winter time. The tribes ask that the teacher use this lesson and story in the winter months. This lesson utilizes the Confederated Tribes of the Goshute (CTGR) tale, “Coyote Loses His Eyes” and the Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah and Ouray Reservation (UIT) tale, “The Eye Juggler Coyote” to enhance comprehension skills and provide an introduction to comparing and contrasting plot, characters, theme and setting. The students will also be introduced to similarities and differences between the two tribes. Lastly, students will write a response summarizing using compare and contrast key words.Native peoples tell stories about Coyote and other animals to their children. Based on Coyote’s mistakes, the elders teach children about proper behavior and positive attitudes. The lessons taught help children to avoid making the same mistakes as Coyote and suffering the consequences in their own lives. 

Subject:
Dance
Elementary English Language Arts
Health Education
History
Literature
Social Studies
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Author:
Brenda Beyal
Lorna Loy
Date Added:
03/22/2022
Coyote and the Buffalo
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

The Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah and Ouray Reservation (UIT) tale, “Coyote and the Buffalo” is read and used to enhance comprehension skills, provide an introduction to the importance of the bison to Native people and gives examples of how choices impact consequences. An activity to explore how Indigenous peoples used different parts of the bison helps students to recognize the ingenuity and creativity of Native Americans.The Ute people tell stories about Coyote and other animals to their children. Based on Coyote’s mistakes, the elders teach children about proper behavior and positive attitudes. The lessons learned help them avoid making the same mistakes Coyote did and suffering the consequences in their own lives. According to Ute tradition, Coyote stories should only be told during the winter time. 

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
Literature
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Reading
Author:
Brenda Beyal
Lorna Loy
Date Added:
03/15/2022
The Eye Juggler Coyote
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson utilizes the Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah and Ouray Reservation (UIT) tale, “The Eye Juggler Coyote” to enhance comprehension skills, provide an introduction to how force affects motion and give information about the UIT. The students will read the tale and then use the story to learn about gravity and balanced forces. The connection of the Ute people to the bison will also be explored. The Ute people tell stories about Coyote and other animals to their children. Based on Coyote’s mistakes, the elders teach children about proper behavior and positive attitudes. The lessons learned help them avoid making the same mistakes Coyote made and suffering the consequences in their own lives.

Subject:
Elementary English Language Arts
Health Science Education
Literature
Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Lorna Loy
Brenda Beyal
Date Added:
03/23/2022
The Northern Ute Tribe
Rating
0.0 stars

Homepage for the Northern Ute Tribe, with links to current information regarding, and affecting, tribal life.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Ute Indian Tribe
Date Added:
01/15/2019
Rethinking First Contact: the Effects of European...
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

The student will combine their knowledge of Christopher Columbus with information about first contact among the Great Basin tribes to understand the many consequences of contact between Indians and Europeans in the Great Basin.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Utah Lesson Plans
Date Added:
09/17/2021
Ute Indians: Past and Present
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Students will become familiar with the Ute Indians both past and present.Enduring Understandings:Who the Ute Indians were and their significance in Utah history.What the Ute culture was like before European expansion.How things are different today for the Ute Indians today compared to the past

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Utah Lesson Plans
Date Added:
10/25/2021
Why Buzzard Is a Loner
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson utilizes the Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah and Ouray Reservation (UIT) tale, “Why Buzzard Is a Loner” to enhance comprehension skills, provide an introduction to the importance of personal hygiene and drama. Although some Native American Indian stories can only be told during the winter time, this story can be told any time of the year. The tale will be read aloud to the students who will then dramatize the story as it is read again. Then students will have a presentation from a health practitioner, school counselor or the school nurse on healthy teeth maintenance (i.e., brushing, flossing, rinsing, etc.)Extensions include learning more about birds in Utah and lessons that give more information about the Ute people. The cultural note states, “Just as the birds in this story held a council meeting to decide how to deal with Buzzard. Ute people, to this day, have council meetings to discuss problems and solutions for their people. At these meetings, everyone has the right to express his or her opinion and be heard and listened to.” 

Subject:
Elementary English Language Arts
Health Science Education
Literature
Social Studies
Theater
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Author:
Brenda Beyal
Date Added:
03/16/2022