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The Age of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1500-1900
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This course will introduce the student to the history of the Atlantic slave trade from 1500 to 1900. The student will learn about the slave trade, its causes, and its effects on Africa, Europe, and the Americas. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the Atlantic slave trade began as a fledgling enterprise of the English, Portuguese, and Spanish in the 1500s and why, by the mid-eighteenth century, the trade dominated Atlantic societies and economies. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: think analytically about the various meanings of 'slave' and 'slavery' during the age of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'triangular trade' and define the Atlantic World; identify and describe the logic for enslavement of Africans by Europeans; identify and describe the African ethnic groups enslaved by Europeans and those captives' New World destinations; identify and describe the early slaving voyages of the Portuguese and Spanish. Students will also be able to describe how the Dutch and English later inserted themselves into the trade; identify and describe the expansion of the plantation complex in the New World in the 1600s and its impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze the rise of European empires and the parallel expansion of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze slavery within African societies. They will also be able to identify and describe the trans-Saharan slave trade and the Red Sea/Indian Ocean slave trade; identify and describe the nature of the African slave market and principal slaving ports in western Africa; analyze and describe New World slave societies and their impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'Middle Passage' of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the causes for the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade in the nineteenth century; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate all aspects of the Atlantic slave trade. (History 311)

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
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Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/29/2018
Algebra2Go - Prealgebra
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Prepare yourself to take an Algebra course with the Algebra2go䋢 prealgebra resources page. Whether you are attending Saddleback College's prealgebra class (math 351), taking a prealgebra class at another school, or need to refresh your math skills for a business or science class, Professor Perez and his favorite student Charlie have the tools that can help you. We have five primary types of study materials: class notes, video worksheets, video lectures, practice problems, and practice quizzes. For some topics we have some additional tools to assist you.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Saddleback College
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Author:
Candice Harrington
Larry Perez
Patrick Quigley
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Algebra2go- PreAlgebra - Intro to Subtraction
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This course is for community college students featuring Professor Perez and his student Charlie. This lesson demonstrates subtraction, including when the answer is negative, on the number line.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Saddleback College
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Author:
Candice Harrington
Larry Perez
Patrick Quigley
Date Added:
07/05/2018
American Political Thought
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This course will cover American political thought from the nation's founding through the 1960s, exploring the political theories that have shaped its governance. As there is no one philosopher or idea that represents the totality of American political thought, the student will survey the writings and speeches of those who have had the greatest impact over this period of time. Much of the study required in this course is based on the original texts and speeches of those who influenced political thought throughout American history. The student will learn and understand the impact that their views and actions have had on the modern American state. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the religious and political origins of the American political system; explain how Enlightenment thinkers, such as John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Baron de Montesquieu, influenced the political philosophies of American founding fathers; analyze how the colonial American experience shaped many of the core values represented in American government and expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution; compare and contrast the differing opinions on the role of the government that the founders expressed; trace the development and evolution of the concepts of 'states rights' and 'federal (national) supremacy'; connect the observations of De Tocqueville in Democracy in America to the concepts of equality, individuality, and civic engagement in American political discourse; examine the evolution of race in the American political system (from slavery to the 2008 election of Barack Obama); discuss the changes in the political role of women in America from its colonial days to the present; connect the concept of 'American Exceptionalism' to the industrial revolution, capitalism, and imperialism; analyze the roots of reform in the Progressive Era and their impact on modern political discourse; explain major principles of American foreign relations over time; assess the purpose and impact of ĺÎĺĺĺŤAmerican war rhetoricĄ_ĺĺö over time; differentiate between 'liberal' and 'conservative' political beliefs in modern American government; illustrate how the political turmoil in the 1960s greatly shaped contemporary American political discourse; evaluate the current political discourse as represented in the 2008 and 2010 elections. (Political Science 301)

Subject:
History
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Assessment
Full Course
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Lecture Notes
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Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/29/2018
Applied Probability
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Focuses on modeling, quantification, and analysis of uncertainty by teaching random variables, simple random processes and their probability distributions, Markov processes, limit theorems, elements of statistical inference, and decision making under uncertainty. This course extends the discrete probability learned in the discrete math class. It focuses on actual applications, and places little emphasis on proofs. A problem set based on identifying tumors using MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) is done using Matlab.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Provider:
ArsDigita University
Provider Set:
ArsDigita University
Author:
Rajeev Surati
Tina Kapur
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Beginning Algebra (BPCC Open Campus: Math 098)
Rating

In this beginning algebra course, you'll learn about fundamental operations on real numbers, exponents, solving linear equations and inequalities, applications, functions, graphing linear equations, slope, and systems of linear equations. This course was created by Bossier Parish Community College as part of its MOOC series "Open Campus." NOTE: Open Campus courses are non-credit reviews and tutorials and cannot be used to satisfy requirements in any curriculum at BPCC. (Beginning Algebra Course by Bossier Parish Community College is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://bpcc.edu/opencampus/index.html.)

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Bossier Parish Community College
Author:
Gail Hendrix
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Biostatistics for Medical Product Regulation
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This course provides a broad understanding of the application of biostatistics in a regulatory context. Reviews the relevant regulations and guidance documents. Includes topics such as basic study design, target population, comparison groups, and endpoints. Addresses analysis issues with emphasis on the regulatory aspects, including issues of missing data and informative censoring. Discusses safety monitoring, interim analysis and early termination of trials with a focus on regulatory implications.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Provider Set:
JHSPH OpenCourseWare
Author:
Mary Foulkes
Simon Day
Date Added:
09/15/2008
CK-12 Geometry Honors Concepts
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This Geometry Concept Collection is a rigorous presentation of high school geometry. It is fully correlated with the Common Core State Standards.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Textbook
Unit of Study
Provider:
CK–12
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Author:
Kaitlyn Spong
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Calculus III (MATH 153)
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No Strings Attached
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This contemporary calculus course is the third in a three-part sequence. In this course students continue to explore the concepts, applications, and techniques of Calculus - the mathematics of change. Calculus has wide-spread application in science, economics and engineering, and is a foundation college course for further work in these areas. This is a required class for most science and mathematics majors.Login: guest_oclPassword: ocl

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
10/31/2011
Calculus II (MATH 152)
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This contemporary calculus course is the second in a three-part sequence. In this course students continue to explore the concepts, applications, and techniques of Calculus - the mathematics of change. Calculus has wide-spread application in science, economics and engineering, and is a foundation college course for further work in these areas. This is a required class for most science and mathematics majors.Login: guest_oclPassword: ocl

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
10/31/2011
Calculus I (MATH 151)
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This course is an introduction to contemporary calculus and is the first of a three-part sequence. In this course students explore the concepts, applications, and techniques of Calculus - the mathematics of change. Calculus has wide-spread application in science, economics and engineering, and is a foundation college course for further work in these areas. This is a required class for most science and mathematics majors.Login: guest_oclPassword: ocl

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
10/31/2011
Campaigns and Elections
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In this course, the student will explore campaigns and elections, learning their purpose and significance and observing the impact that they have on the American political system. The course will focus on the history and evolution of elections and voting laws in the United States, as well as what compels individuals to run for office and how campaigns are structured. Also, the course will teach the student the role that political parties, interest groups, voters, and the media play in elections. Lastly, the student will take a closer look at electoral outcomes and the impact that elections have on public policy after votes are counted, as well as what types of proposals could be implemented to improve our electoral system. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain the importance of elections, voting, democracy, and citizenship in the United States; describe the various types of elections that exist within the American political system; identify the legal and constitutional bases of campaigns and elections in the United States; explain the types of individuals that run for political office and why; analyze the influence of incumbency in elections; explain how candidates develop campaigns and financing; discuss the role of money in political campaigns; discuss the influence of political parties on campaigns and elections; describe the characteristics of the U.S. party system; explain the role of interest groups in influence campaigns and election outcomes; explain the various influences and motivations of the American voter; describe the factors associated with both nonvoter and voter disenfranchisement in contemporary elections; analyze and explain the critical role of the media in campaigns and elections; explain how election outcomes impact government actions and public policy; analyze both historical and contemporary election reforms. (POLSC333)

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/29/2018
Capitalism and Democracy in America
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The purpose of this course is to trace the twin paths of capitalism and democracy through American history. This course is premised on the idea that capitalism and democracy are intertwined, though they have often conflicted with one another. It provides students with a brief introduction to the history of capitalism and democracy in Europe and then to explore how they evolved in North America between 1600 and the present. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: define and identify the terms 'capitalism' and 'democracy' in a variety of different modern historical eras; identify and define the historical connections between capitalism and democracy and identify periods of tension between capitalism and democracy, explaining how they both strengthen and weaken one another; identify important events, personalities, and concepts related to American democracy and capitalism; identify and describe the emergence and development of both capitalism and democracy in the United States; identify and describe the different periods of American history as they relate to the concepts of capitalism and democracy. (History 312)

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/29/2018
Comparative New Worlds, 1400-1750
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This course will introduce the student to a comparative history of New World societies from 1400 to 1750. The student will learn about European exploration and colonization as well as the culture of native peoples of the Americas. By the end of the course, you will understand how the New World evolved from fledgling settlements into profitable European colonies and how New World societies were highly varied polities. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: analyze what constituted the 'New World' in the fifteenth century; identify and describe the major tribes/native civilizations of North America, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean at the time of European contact; identify and describe the effects of European colonization on native peoples; identify and describe the reasons for the European Age of Discovery in the New World; identify and describe early New World exploration and initial settlements by Portugal and Spain; identify and describe how and why the consolidation of powerful European states in the 1600s resulted in New World exploration, settlement, and commerce; compare and contrast New France, French Louisiana, the French West Indies, and French Guiana; compare and contrast British North America (New England, Middle and Lower Colonies), the British West Indies, and British Central and South America; compare and contrast New Spain, the Spanish Caribbean, and Spanish South America; analyze and describe Portuguese Brazil; identify and describe the African slave trade and will also be able to compare and contrast the enslavement of Africans in New World societies; identify and describe inter-European conflicts and European-Native Indian violence in the New World; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate the causes and effects of exploration and colonization in the New World. (History 321)

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Assessment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/29/2018
Concord Consortium: Phase Change
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This interactive activity for grades 8-12 features eight models that explore atomic arrangements for gases, solids, and liquids. Highlight an atom and view its trajectory to see how the motion differs in each of the three primary phases. As the lesson progresses, students observe and manipulate differences in attractions among atoms in each state and experiment with adding energy to produce state changes. More advanced students can explore models of latent heat and evaporative cooling. This item is part of the Concord Consortium, a nonprofit research and development organization dedicated to transforming education through technology.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Data Set
Diagram/Illustration
Full Course
Interactive
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
The Concord Consortium
Date Added:
05/11/2011
Discrete Mathematics
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This course covered the mathematical topics most directly related to computer science. Topics included: logic, relations, functions, basic set theory, countability and counting arguments, proof techniques, mathematical induction, graph theory, combinatorics, discrete probability, recursion, recurrence relations, and number theory. Emphasis will be placed on providing a context for the application of the mathematics within computer science. The analysis of algorithms requires the ability to count the number of operations in an algorithm. Recursive algorithms in particular depend on the solution to a recurrence equation, and a proof of correctness by mathematical induction. The design of a digital circuit requires the knowledge of Boolean algebra. Software engineering uses sets, graphs, trees and other data structures. Number theory is at the heart of secure messaging systems and cryptography. Logic is used in AI research in theorem proving and in database query systems. Proofs by induction and the more general notions of mathematical proof are ubiquitous in theory of computation, compiler design and formal grammars. Probabilistic notions crop up in architectural trade-offs in hardware design.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
ArsDigita University
Provider Set:
ArsDigita University
Author:
Shai Simonson
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Environmental History
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This course will focus on the history of mankind's relationship with the natural world. The student will examine how environmental factors have shaped the development and growth of civilizations around the world and analyze how these civilizations have altered their environments in positive and negative ways. By the end of the course, the student will better understand the reciprocal relationship between human beings and the natural environment and how this relationship has evolved throughout human history. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: think critically about the historical relationship between humans and the natural environment; identify how early humans modified and adapted natural resources for agricultural and commercial purposes; analyze how human settlements altered the natural environment and evaluate how environmental factors shaped the growth of early civilizations; evaluate how new agricultural and commercial practices altered the natural environment across the globe during the Middle Ages; identify how environmental factors, such as disease and pollution, shaped political and social life in Europe during the Early-Modern Era; evaluate how the Columbian Exchange resulted in significant ecological and biological changes in Europe and the Americas and dramatically altered human societies on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean; analyze the impact of industrialization on human society during the Modern Era and evaluate how governmental and nongovernmental actors have attempted to ameliorate the negative environmental consequences of industrialization; identify current environmental challenges facing humanity and analyze these challenges from a historical perspective; analyze and interpret primary and secondary source documents relating to environmental history using historical research methods. (History 364)

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/29/2018
Essentials of Probability and Statistical Inference IV: Algorithmic and Nonparametric Approaches
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Introduces the theory and application of modern, computationally-based methods for exploring and drawing inferences from data. Covers re-sampling methods, non-parametric regression, prediction, and dimension reduction and clustering. Specific topics include Monte Carlo simulation, bootstrap cross-validation, splines, local weighted regression, CART, random forests, neural networks, support vector machines, and hierarchical clustering. De-emphasizes proofs and replaces them with extended discussion of interpretation of results and simulation and data analysis for illustration.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Provider Set:
JHSPH OpenCourseWare
Author:
Irizarry, Rafael
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Global Perspectives on Industrialization
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This course will focus on the emergence and evolution of industrial societies around the world. The student will begin by comparing the legacies of industry in ancient and early modern Europe and Asia and examining the agricultural and commercial advances that laid the groundwork for the Industrial Revolution. The student will then follow the history of industrialization in different parts of the world, taking a close look at the economic, social, and environmental effects of industrialization. This course ultimately examines how industrialization developed, spread across the globe, and shaped everyday life in the modern era. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify key ideas and events in the history of industrialization; identify connections between the development of capitalism and the development of modern industry; use analytical tools to evaluate the factors contributing to industrial change in different societies; identify the consequences of industrialization in the 19th and 20th centuries in different societies; critique historical interpretations of the causes and effects of industrialization; and analyze and interpret primary source documents describing the process of industrialization and life in industrial societies. (History 363)

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/29/2018
Intermediate Algebra (MATH 9Y)
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Students will learn to solve compound inequalities, absolute value inequalities, and systems of equations, simplify radical expressions, solve quadratic equations and applications and simplify compound fractions, solve rational equations and applications, use function notation to solve problems and use exponential and logarithmic functions.Login: guest_oclPassword: ocl

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
10/31/2011