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7th Grade Constitution Resources

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The Confrontation Clause: Crawford v. Washington
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The Sixth Amendment's confrontation clause gives the accused the right âto be confronted with the witnesses against himâ at a criminal trial. This film uses the U.S. Supreme Court case Crawford v. Washington to help explain the history and importance of the confrontation clause and why the framers knew it would be crucial to an effective system of justice.â

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Interactive
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Date Added:
08/11/2022
Constitution Day Live 2021 | Liberty & Equality
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How do liberty and equality interact in the Constitution? On Friday, September 17th from 10:30 AM to 3:00 PM ET, the Bill of Rights Institute streamed this live event and welcomed scholars, thinkers, and teachers to explore the relevancy of the Constitution today. How can we work to balance liberty and equality in our communities? Where do tensions arise between the two principles, and what tools from the Constitution can we use to work toward resolution?

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Bill of Rights Institute
Date Added:
09/12/2022
The Constitution Explained | A Primary Source Close Read w/ BRI
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How is the Constitution structured? In this episode of our "Close Reads: Explained" series, Kirk tackles the Constitution and explains its biggest concepts to you. What does the document teach us about the government it defines?

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Bill of Rights Institute
Date Added:
09/12/2022
The Constitutional Dictionary
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This document is a glossary of words, phrases, and concepts used in the United States Constitution. Note that some words are defined only as they apply to the Constitution itself. The page does have advertisements as well, so it is best used as a teacher resource.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
The U.S. Constitution On-Line
Date Added:
01/03/2023
The Constitution for Kids: The Constitution for Kids: 4th through 7th Grade
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This webpage explains the basics of the U.S. Constitution at an upper elementary and middle school level. It includes the following sections: Basics, History, Amendments, Slavery, Women, Bill of Rights, How it all Works. The page does have advertisements as well, so it is best used as a teacher resource.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
The U.S. Constitution On-Line
Provider Set:
The Constitution for Kids
Date Added:
01/03/2023
The Constitution of the United States
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The Constitution acted like a colossal merger, uniting a group of states with different interests, laws, and cultures. Under Americaâ"s first national government, the Articles of Confederation, the states acted together only for specific purposes. The Constitution united its citizens as members of a whole, vesting the power of the union in the people. Without it, the American Experiment might have ended as quickly as it had begun.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
National Archives
Date Added:
06/02/2022
Constitution of the United States of America (1787)
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The Constitution was written in the summer of 1787 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, by delegates from 12 states, in order to replace the Articles of Confederation with a new form of government. It created a federal system with a national government composed of 3 separated powers, and included both reserved and concurrent powers of states. The president of the Constitutional Convention, the body that framed the new government, was George Washington, though James Madison is known as the "Father of the Constitution" because of his great contributions to the formation of the new government. Gouverneur Morris wrote the Constitutionâ"s final language. The Constitution was a compact – though Federalists and Anti-Federalists disagreed over whether the states or the people were the agents of the compact.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Bill of Rights Institute
Date Added:
09/12/2022
A Conversation on Judicial Interpretation
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This lesson plan focuses on the essential question: How does philosophy affect the way a judge reads the Constitution and what is the effect of that? Teachers will use the Annenberg Classroom video âA Conversation on the Constitution: Judicial Interpretationâ in which Supreme Court Justices Antonin Scalia, a strict constructionist, and Stephen Breyer, an evolutionist, debate how the Constitution should be interpreted.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Date Added:
08/11/2022
Created Equal
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The Declaration of Independence asserts that ‘all men are created equal’ and are endowed with certain unalienable rights - ‘life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness’. When those words were written, over 52 percent of Williamsburg’s population was enslaved. This is a special release of Created Equal,” a museum theatre exploration of African American perspectives on the Declaration, the revolutions it inspired, and the ongoing struggle for equality and freedom in America. It first premiered live on stage at Colonial Williamsburg on July 4th, 2019.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Colonial Williamsburg
Date Added:
09/13/2022
Declaration of Independence
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Since 2005, the "Past and Present" podcast from Colonial Williamsburg has taken you behind the scenes to meet interpreters, chefs, tradesmen, musicians, historians, curators, and more. We offer two versions of our podcast: one that's audio-only and one that includes a slideshow. In this episode: Hear the Declaration of Independence read in its entirety by renowned Thomas Jefferson interpreter Bill Barker.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Simulation
Provider:
Colonial Williamsburg
Date Added:
09/13/2022
The Declaration of Independence
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The Declaration of Independence states the principles on which our government, and our identity as Americans, are based. Unlike the other founding documents, the Declaration of Independence is not legally binding, but it is powerful. Abraham Lincoln called it "a rebuke and a stumbling-block to tyranny and oppression." It continues to inspire people around the world to fight for freedom and equality.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
National Archives
Date Added:
09/12/2022
The Delegates Who Didn't Sign the U.S. Constitution
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In all, 70 delegates were appointed to the Constitutional Convention, but out of that 70 only 55 attended, and only 39 actually signed. Some simply refused, others got sick, still others left early.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
ConstitutionFacts.com
Date Added:
01/03/2023
An Energetic Executive
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The purpose of this lesson is to assist student understanding of the expressed and implied powers of the president. By the conclusion of this lesson, students will understand the scope and purpose of these powers and be able to describe how they play out in real life. Students will also understand the importance of constitutional checks on presidential powers--examining the ways that a president could abuse his or her power should constitutional checks not exist. Students will also understand the informal ways the public contributes to the president’s role.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ConSource
Date Added:
05/10/2024
Every Four Years: Introducing Presidential Elections
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The students will examine, explain, and evaluate Article II, Section 1 of the US Constitution for specific information concerning the eligibility requirements and election process for the office of President of the United States and develop a position and express a viewpoint on the lesson’s "essential question": "How democratic is the American election process for the office of president?"

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Date Added:
05/10/2024
Every Four Years: Qualifications for the Office of President and Electing the President
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Students will examine aspects of Article II of the Constitution for specific information related to the requirements for and method of electing the president.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Date Added:
05/10/2024