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Article 3 Judicial Branch

Collection image: "The US Supreme Court up close and personal" by Yellow3467 from Wikimedia Commons, CC-BY-SA

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A Conversation on the Constitution with Justices Stephen Breyer and Antonin Scalia: Judicial Interpretation
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Before an audience of high school students, Justices Stephen G. Breyer and Antonin Scalia debate their different theories on how to interpret the Constitution and how they are applied to cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. Justice Scalia describes his textualist, strict constructionist philosophy while Justice Breyer explains his developmentalist, evolutionist philosophy.
Closed captions available in English.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Interactive
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Date Added:
08/11/2022
A Conversation on the Nature, Origin and Importance of the Supreme Court
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This lesson explains the structure and function of the judicial branch. Students will learn how the Supreme Court originated, how cases are selected, and why it is an important institution. In the accompanying Annenberg Classroom video âA Conversation on the Constitution: The Origin, Nature and Importance of the Supreme Court,â Chief Justice John G. Roberts answers students' questions about the Supreme Court and his role as chief justice of the United States.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Date Added:
08/11/2022
Deciding Difficult Cases
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This discussion guide is for use with the video âDeciding Difficult Cases,â which features Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, interviewing the Hon. Emmet G. Sullivan, U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, at the Fair and Impartial Judiciary Symposium on October 26, 2019, at the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Date Added:
08/11/2022
A Deep Stain on the American Character: John Marshall and Justice for Native Americans
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In this lesson, students will learn about the actions of John Marshall concerning the Cherokee nation. They will explore how his actions helped to advance justice and, through his example, learn how they can advance justice in their own lives.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Bill of Rights Institute
Date Added:
09/12/2022
Due Process and Fair Trials
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In this lesson, students will evaluate contradictory viewpoints concerning liberty and security. They will evaluate Supreme Court decisions regarding fair trials, due process, and the war on terror and evaluate whether the Constitution takes on different meanings during wartime.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Bill of Rights Institute
Date Added:
09/12/2022
Fair and Impartial Judiciary Symposium
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The Fair and Impartial Judiciary Symposium convened lawyers, scholars, judges and thought leaders at the University of Pennsylvania Law School to address the meaning and impact of an independent judiciary. The topics included the meaning of âfair and impartial judiciaryâ; the difference between state and federal courts; the challenges to judicial independence; deciding difficult cases; and the Supreme Court. Justice Anthony M. Kennedy gave the closing talk on âThe Nature of Judicial Independence.â The symposium was organized by the Rendell Center for Civics and Civic Education in partnership with the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania. Discussion guides accompany the videos.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Interactive
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Date Added:
08/11/2022
Habeas Corpus: The Guantanamo Cases
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One of our oldest human rights, habeas corpus safeguards individual freedom by preventing unlawful or arbitrary imprisonment. This documentary examines habeas corpus and the separation of powers in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks as the Supreme Court tried to strike a balance between the president's duty to protect the nation and the constitutional protection of civil liberties in four major Guantanamo Bay cases: Hamdi v. Rumsfeld, Rasul v. Bush, Hamdan v. Rumsfeld and Boumediene v. Bush.

Closed captions available in English and Spanish.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Interactive
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Date Added:
08/11/2022
How Do Judges Decide Cases?
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This discussion guide is for use with the video âHow Do Judges Decide Cases?â which features the Hon. Anthony J. Scirica of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and Stephen Burbank, professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, at the Fair and Impartial Judiciary Symposium on October 26, 2019, at the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Date Added:
08/11/2022
An Independent Judiciary: Cherokee Nation v. Georgia and Cooper v. Aaron
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This documentary, featuring Justice Stephen G. Breyer and leading constitutional scholars, chronicles two key moments that defined our understanding of the role of the judiciary: the Cherokee Nation's struggles before the U.S. Supreme Court in the 1830s to preserve its homeland in Cherokee Nation v. Georgia, and Cooper v. Aaron (1958), which affirmed that states were bound to follow the Court's order to integrate their schools. (34 min)

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Interactive
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Date Added:
08/11/2022
An Independent Judiciary: Cherokee Nation v. Georgia and Cooper v. Aaron
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This lesson explores the role of the judiciary in relation to the legislative and executive branches and how judicial independence has evolved since the founding of the nation. Two significant cases covered in the lesson, Cherokee Nation v. Georgia (1831) and Cooper v. Aaron (1958), exemplify the importance of an independent judiciary. Students will use their knowledge based on watching the Annenberg Classroom video âAn Independent Judiciary.â

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Date Added:
08/11/2022
Is the Supreme Court Different?
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This discussion guide is for use with the video âIs the Supreme Court Different?â which features a conversation with Linda Greenhouse, the Knight Distinguished Journalist in Residence and Joseph M. Goldstein Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School, who is interviewed by Theodore W. Ruger, dean of the University of Pennsylvania Law School, at the Fair and Impartial Judiciary Symposium on October 26, 2019, at the Penn Law School.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Date Added:
08/11/2022
John Marshall, Marbury v. Madison, and Judicial Review
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CC BY
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If James Madison was the "father" of the Constitution," John Marshall was the "father of the Supreme Court""”almost single-handedly clarifying its powers. This new lesson is designed to help students understand Marshall's brilliant strategy in issuing his decision on Marbury v. Madison, the significance of the concept of judicial review, and the language of this watershed case.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
11/06/2019
The Judicial Branch
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Students will learn about the federal and state courts and what they do. They will explore the courts’ role in fairly settling disputes and administering justice, and the unique role of the U.S. Supreme Court in interpreting the U.S. Constitution.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
ICivics
Date Added:
03/22/2024
The Judicial Branch
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In this one-minute video, students learn about the judicial branch of government. A host explains the structure and function of the judicial branch, and students will analyze the role that the judicial branch plays in the United States government.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Nearpod
Provider:
Nearpod
Date Added:
11/02/2023
Judicial Independence: Essential, Limited, Controversial
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In a constitutional system of government, the role of the judiciary is essential for maintaining the balance of power, protecting individual rights, upholding the rule of law, interpreting the Constitution, and ensuring equal justice for all.
The estimated time for this lesson plan is two class periods.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Date Added:
08/11/2022