Article 1 Legislative Branch

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Actions of the First Congress
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Students should have a solid foundation of the regional differences in the former colonies, now states, as well as an understanding of the ratification of the Constitution. This Lesson is best used after students have read The Constitutional Convention and The Ratification Debate on the Constitution Narratives in Chapter 3. The James Madison and the Bill of Rights Narrative in Chapter 4 can be used as background for the Lesson or can be assigned as homework after the Lesson to reinforce main ideas.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Bill of Rights Institute
Date Added:
09/12/2022
All Legislative Powers Herein Granted – The Legislative Process 1789-1860
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In the early republic, Congress was a colorful, exciting, unpredictable, and contentious branch of the United States government. The members constantly quarreled but often deliberated and compromised through persuasive oratory and rational conversation. Congress was divided by party and sectionalism, but was guided through these difficulties by legislative statesmen. The Congress continued to function as the undisputed law making body of the people of the United States. Even during some of its most tumultuous years, from 1789 until the outbreak of the Civil War in 1860, the Congress effectively governed the nation.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Bill of Rights Institute
Date Added:
09/12/2022
Branches of Power
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This game immerses students in the workings of our three branches of government. Players take on the roles of legislator, president and Supreme Court justice to get constitutional laws enacted. Players must juggle several bills at once while holding press conferences and town hall meetings.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Game
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Date Added:
08/11/2022
Committees
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Committees improve the organization of the Senate and House of Representatives. Members of Congress cannot be experts on all issues. For this reason, the Senate and House of Representatives developed committees that focus on particular subjects.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
U.S. Capitol Visitor Center
Date Added:
08/11/2022
A Conversation on the Constitution with Justice Stephen Breyer: Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co.
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Justice Stephen G. Breyer and a group of high school students discuss separation of powers among the three branches of government in connection with the pay discrimination case Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. that resulted in a 2009 law called the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Interactive
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Date Added:
08/11/2022
The District of Columbia Compensated Emancipation Act of 1862
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The D.C. Compensated Emancipation Act was an important and symbolic victory. It was part of a larger struggle over the meaning and practice of freedom and citizenship. What does it mean to be a participating member of society? What does freedom and citizenship mean?

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
U.S. Capitol Visitor Center
Date Added:
08/11/2022
How Your State Gets Its Seats
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Congressional Apportionment: The United States Senate consists of how many members? The answer is fairly simple: with two members apiece representing each of the fifty states, the total is one hundred. How about the House of Representatives? The answer is much more complicated.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
U.S. Capitol Visitor Center
Date Added:
08/11/2022
How a Bill Becomes a Federal Law
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The process of how a bill becomes a federal law is more than a series of linked steps. It is the fundamental way people in a democracy get involved and work through their elected officials to meet needs and solve problems to benefit themselves and other Americans. Through this lesson, students will learn about the dynamic process of federal lawmaking and how it relates to them.
The estimated time for the lesson is three to five class periods. It is aligned to the National Standards for Civics and Government.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Date Added:
08/11/2022
LawCraft
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Lawcraft from icivics.org. this online game helps students experience the ins and outs of taking an idea and turning it into a law while dealing with the political travails in Washington.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
ICivics
Date Added:
09/07/2022
LawCraft
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Learn how laws are made in an updated version of LawCraft. Select a district to represent in the House of Representatives, then review letters from constituents. You'll dig into survey data and select an issue that's important to you and the people who live in your district. Take that issue to the House and jump into the law-making process. See if you can make the compromises necessary to get your bill passed by the House and Senate and still make a law you're proud of.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Game
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Date Added:
08/11/2022