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American Founding Toolkit
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The era of the American Founding lasted from the 1770s through either the late 1780s or early 1790s, depending on one’s perspective or school of thought. For the sake of this resource, the Founding is defined as being the period from 1776 through 1789 – that is, from the writing of the Declaration of Independence through George Washington’s inauguration as the country’s first president. This toolkit provides guiding questions and links to essential documents, resources, and lesson plans related to America's founding.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
03/22/2024
The American Revolution
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America's independence from Great Britain was a decisive turning point in world history. Join us to explore the causes, character, and consequences of an American Revolution that continues to shape lives around the globe. This site is a virtual museum experience. Explore the American Revolution by timeline, people, and multimedia.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Interactive
Provider:
Colonial Williamsburg
Date Added:
09/13/2022
Ancient Republics and European Charters
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In this lesson, students will compare and contrast excerpts from The Republic of Plato and selected Federalist Papers by James Madison to determine in what ways Madison agreed and disagreed with Plato, regarding human nature the proper role of government in a society. What influence did Plato have on James Madison and the writers of the Constitution? In what ways did they agree? In what ways did they disagree?

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Bill of Rights Institute
Date Added:
09/12/2022
Annenberg Classroom's That's Your Right
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A challenging, fun card game that helps students learn about their rights under the Bill of Rights, the first 10 amendments to the Constitution. The game offers three levels of play: Easy, Normal, Difficult.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Game
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Date Added:
08/11/2022
An "Apple of Gold" in a "Picture of Silver": The Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution
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What is the relationship between the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution? How do these Founding documents reflect common republican principles?

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Bill of Rights Institute
Date Added:
09/12/2022
The Articles of Confederation
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In 1777, the Second Continental Congress adopted the Articles of Confederation. The objectives of this activity are: Students will analyze the provisions of the Articles of Confederation. Students will determine why individuals such as George Washington expressed a growing concern over government’s inadequacies, and why these concerns were expressed by and heightened after events such as Shays’s Rebellion. Students will explain why there was a growing call for creating a strong central government and the rationales for the various arguments.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Bill of Rights Institute
Date Added:
03/22/2024
Asian American & Pacific Islander Perspectives within Humanities Education
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Organized around the compelling question "How have Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders engaged civically and contributed to U.S. culture?" and grounded in inquiry-based teaching and learning, this lesson brings history, civics, and the arts together to learn about the experiences and perspectives of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) in U.S. history. elementary sources, literature, and works of art created by AAPI individuals and related organizations provide an historical as well as contemporary context for concepts and issues including civic participation, immigration, and culture.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
11/06/2019
Background Beliefs
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We've all had that experience, the one where we start arguing with someone and find that we disagree about pretty much everything. When two people have radically different background beliefs (or worldviews), they often have difficulty finding any sort of common ground. In this lesson, students will learn to distinguish between the two different types of background beliefs: beliefs about matters of fact and beliefs about values. They will then go on to consider their most deeply held background beliefs, those that constitute their worldview. Students will work to go beyond specific arguments to consider the worldviews that might underlie different types of arguments.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Annenberg Foundation
Provider Set:
Annenberg Classroom
Author:
Joe Miller, Ph.D.
Date Added:
08/11/2022
Bending Toward Justice Teaching Voting Rights and Representation with iCivics + We the People
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In this webinar by iCivics and the Center for Civic Education, Henry L. Chambers, Jr., Emma Humphries, and Mike Fassold explain the long and troubled history of voting rights in the United States and share tips for teaching representation and the expansion of suffrage.

Mike Fassold, an educator from Fishers Junior High School in Indiana, explains how he teaches the expansion of voting rights using the We the People middle school curriculum. Fassold is followed by Professor Henry Chambers, the Austin E. Owen Research Scholar & Professor of Law at the University of Richmond, who discusses the 2020 Census, apportionment, and gerrymandering. Finally, Emma Humphries, the Chief Education Officer at iCivics, explores compelling new infographics and Web activities on the census, gerrymandering, and voting that will engage your students.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Center for Civic Education
Date Added:
09/12/2022
The Bill of Rights
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The Constitution might never have been ratified if the framers hadn't promised to add a Bill of Rights. The first ten amendments to the Constitution gave citizens more confidence in the new government and contain many of today's Americans' most valued freedoms.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
National Archives
Date Added:
09/12/2022
Bill of Rights (1791)
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The first 10 amendments to the Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. James Madison wrote the amendments, which list specific prohibitions on governmental power, in response to calls from several states for greater constitutional protection for individual liberties. For example, the Founders saw the ability to speak and worship freely as a natural right protected by the First Amendment. Congress is prohibited from making laws establishing religion or abridging freedom of speech. The Fourth Amendment safeguards citizensâ" right to be free from unreasonable government intrusion in their homes through the requirement of a warrant.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Bill of Rights Institute
Date Added:
09/12/2022
The Bill of Rights 2.0
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This lesson builds upon prior knowledge of the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights by asking students to think critically about the issues and philosophies central to both. Through investigation and debate, students are asked to question why certain rights were added to the
Constitution and why others were not. Such a discussion will encourage students to synthesize multiple historical and contemporary perspectives about their rights to decide if, in today’s world, we
need different rights, if our rights are complete the way they are, or if the existing ones need change.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ConSource
Date Added:
03/22/2024
The Bill of Rights Choice Board
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The first ten amendments to the United States Constitution, adopted through ratification, are collectively referred to as the Bill of Rights. As the first nine outline fundamental guarantees to the citizenry and the tenth reserves some governmental powers to the state governments, the Bill of Rights establishes limitations on the scope of the federal government. In this lesson, students will explore the history of the Bill of Rights and the meaning of the amendments included in the document through videos and activities.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
C-SPAN Classroom
Date Added:
03/22/2024
Bill of Rights Rap - Smart Songs
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Rap song on the Bill of Rights, hosted by Smart Songs, an educational music group, creating songs about history, social studies, geography, and science---providing kids and teachers with content that makes learning fun. ABC News Los Angeles and The Boston Globe have described the group as the current version of Schoolhouse Rock.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Smart Songs
Date Added:
09/07/2022
The Bill of Rights in Modern Times
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In this lesson, students will learn about the individual rights that are included in the Bill of Rights and current issues relating to them. Students will use C-SPAN Classroom's Constitution Clips to explore what each of these rights mean and determine how these rights apply to current events in America. This lesson works well with classes with one-to-one devices or in flipped classrooms.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
C-SPAN Classroom
Date Added:
03/22/2024