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Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

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The Battle over the Bank: Hamilton v. Jefferson
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In this lesson students will discuss what the necessary and proper clause means to them. They will also put themselves into the shoes of citizens in 1791 and look at Alexander Hamilton’s and Thomas Jefferson’s opinions on the national bank. Students will also learn about the war debt and currency issues so as to better understand the national bank debate. This lesson may be used in an American history class or civics classes as it will allow students to analyze and use primary sources as part of a continuation in developing their social studies skills.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Date Added:
05/10/2024
Calling the Constitutional Convention
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Calling on her two best known books, A Brilliant Solution: Inventing the US Constitution and Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for America's Independence, Carol Berkin, Presidential Professor of American Colonial and Revolutionary History at Baruch College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, briefly discusses some aspects of the American Revolution and the creation of the US Constitution.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Date Added:
05/10/2024
Children on the Homefront
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Resource to help students learna bout how children were involved in the war effort int he 1940s. Includes propaganda posters with students creating their own. Some patriotic songs are provided that were taught ins chools and look at ways to compare contributions during the war to modern times.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Date Added:
03/22/2024
Differences between Federalists and Antifederalists
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This is an infographic that shows the differences between the Federalists and the Antifederalists are vast and at times complex. Federalists’ beliefs could be better described as nationalist. The Federalists were instrumental in 1787 in shaping the new US Constitution, which strengthened the national government at the expense, according to the Antifederalists, of the states and the people. The Antifederalists opposed the ratification of the US Constitution, but they never organized efficiently across all thirteen states, and so had to fight the ratification at every state convention. Their great success was in forcing the first Congress under the new Constitution to establish a bill of rights to ensure the liberties that the Antifederalists felt the Constitution violated.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Author:
Gilder Lehrman Institute Staff
Date Added:
03/22/2024
Elementary Curriculum I: Colonial America to Reconstruction -- US Constitution
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Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History provides elementary lesson plans, student activity sheets and professional development for teachers centered on American History. This unit is focused on the US Constitution.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Gilder-Lehrman Institute
Date Added:
11/09/2023
Every Four Years: Introducing Presidential Elections
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The students will examine, explain, and evaluate Article II, Section 1 of the US Constitution for specific information concerning the eligibility requirements and election process for the office of President of the United States and develop a position and express a viewpoint on the lesson’s "essential question": "How democratic is the American election process for the office of president?"

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Date Added:
05/10/2024
Every Four Years: Qualifications for the Office of President and Electing the President
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Students will examine aspects of Article II of the Constitution for specific information related to the requirements for and method of electing the president.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Date Added:
05/10/2024
The Evolution of the US Constitution: The Preambles to the Articles of Confederation and the US Constitution
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This lesson plan is part of Gilder Lehrman’s series of Common Core State Standards–based teaching resources. These resources were developed to enable students to understand, summarize, and analyze original texts of historical significance. Through a step-by-step process, students will acquire the skills to analyze any primary or secondary source material.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Date Added:
05/10/2024
Farewell to Manzanar: Japanese Internment Camps During World War II
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Resource contains activity prompts, essay topics and ideas, and other lesson activities that coincide with reading Farewell to Manzanar and learning about Japanese Internment

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Date Added:
03/22/2024
"Father" of Our Country v. "Father" of the Bill of Rights
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This lesson addresses two essential questions: To what extent does the Bill of Rights provide a "blanket of protection" for American citizens? Why do many Americans believe that the Bill of Rights is especially relevant today?

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Date Added:
05/10/2024
Historical Context: The Constitution and Slavery
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On the 200th anniversary of the ratification of the US Constitution, Thurgood Marshall, the first African American to sit on the Supreme Court, said that the Constitution was "defective from the start." Read more about the Constitution and slavery in this article by Steven Mintz.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Date Added:
05/10/2024
Historical Context: The Survival of the US Constitution
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The United States has the oldest written national framework of government in the world. At the end of the twentieth century, there were about 159 other national constitutions in the world, and 101 had been adopted since 1970. Read more in this article written by Steven Mintz.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Date Added:
05/10/2024