Author:
Julia
Subject:
Elementary Mathematics, Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Upper Elementary
Provider:
South Sanpete School District
Provider Set:
South Sanpete School District
Tags:
  • Addition
  • BeeBot
  • Coding
  • Computer Science
  • Subtraction
  • april22
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Text/HTML

    Education Standards

    BeeBot Code and Go: Sequencing D3

    BeeBot Code and Go: Sequencing D3

    Overview

    This is a computer science lesson plan created by educators in the South Sanpete School District. This lesson plan utilizes BeeBot robots. Students will explore the concepts of sequencing and making a mental plan before coding. Students will engage in a math game to solidify their skill of sequencing and creating an algorithm. The lesson is designed for third grade and includes modifications for grades K-5.

    SUMMARY

    Students will explore the concepts of sequencing and making a mental plan before coding. Students will engage in a math game to solidify their skill of sequencing and creating an algorithm.

    CURRICULUM STANDARDS

    CURRICULUM STANDARDS

    1. Math Standard 3.NBT.2 Fluently add and subtract within 1,000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

    2. CS Standard 3.CT.1 Decompose problems into smaller manageable tasks which may themselves be decomposed.

    3. CS Core Practice 2 Collaborating Around Computing

    INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES

    INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES

    At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

    • Plan a sequence of moves for their robot, decomposing the path into smaller steps to reach their final destination 

    • Practice adding and subtracting using strategies and algorithms

    COMPUTER SCIENCE WORDS TO INTRODUCE/REVIEW

    COMPUTER SCIENCE WORDS TO INTRODUCE/REVIEW

    • Decompose To break down into components.

    • Sequence An action, or event arranged in a specific order, from beginning to end.

    INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES

    INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES

    1. Attention Getter: 

      • Ask students about their daily routine everyday! 

      • Highlight that there is an order, or sequence to their choices and lives. 

      • You don’t eat breakfast after school and a student at (name of school) doesn’t go to school at night. There is an order to what they do.

    2. Define the word sequence. Help students connect this topic to their own life and the real-world to help them see that they sequence everyday!

    3. Define the word decompose. Help students to see that to do many tasks in a sequence, they decompose that task into steps. (Brushing your teeth: If you break it down you need to pick up your toothbrush, put the toothpaste on, brush your teeth for two minutes, spit out the toothpaste, and rinse your mouth with water). 

    4. State objective: “Today, you will act as programmers to create a set of commands in a sequence.” (5 min)

    5. Give students time to explore with the GoMouse or BeeBot. Set a timer that’s visible to students for 1 minute. 

      • During the minute, one student will get to program and explore the bot, while the other students watch and observe. When the timer goes off, the bot will be passed to the next student in the group who will get to explore the bot for 1 minute. This will repeat until every student in the group has had a chance to explore. (5-7 min)

    6. Ask students what they noticed about the BeeBot/GoMouse and what they wondered.

    7. Model creating algorithms using the cards and showing their GoMouse moving.

    8. Ask students to explore sequencing with the cards to complete different tasks. (5-7 min). (For example, ask students to place the bot on the yellow square and create a sequence that would make it go to the red square. The group will then take their sequencing cards and decompose the path into individual steps. Students will outline the path using the cards. Once this has happened, students can program their bot, following their plans on the sequencing cards. 

      • Students will collaborate by having one driver, and many navigators. The navigators will give suggestions as to how the driver will need to lay out the sequencing cards to get to the desired destination. Once the driver has created an algorithm using the sequencing cards and tested his or her plan, the role of the driver will switch to the next student. They will work on creating a different sequence to get to the same square. This process will keep continuing throughout time of programming and planning sequencing for the BeeBot/GoMouse.

    9. For the remaining 10 minutes of class, have students play a game that involves their Coding device (BeeBot/GoMouse) and their color map. Flash different problems on the board (with multiple choice answers connected to different squares on the board). Students create a way for their GoMouse to go to that specific square. Ask students to share their routes, as there are diversified ways to travel to the same square. 

      • All students will need to express their understanding by writing their work on a whiteboard. Then using the same driver/navigator system, students will take turns writing the sequences and programming their bot to come to the correct square!

    EXTENSIONS/ADAPTATIONS

    EXTENSIONS/ADAPTATIONS

    • Extensions: Students who master simple sequencing can be challenged to direct their GoMouse to the correct square in the most creative way possible, adding more steps to their algorithm. 

    • Adaptations: Students who are feeling challenged by this activity will be encouraged to focus on just the card sequencing and actually tracing the route the Mouse/BeeBot takes on its way to its desired destination.

    WRAP UP/REFLECTION

    WRAP UP/REFLECTION

    In order to check for student understanding, the teacher will pass out sticky notes and give students a task. On their sticky notes, students are to write down the path they would take to get from the Yellow Square to the Blue Square using the arrows. 

    Teacher will review the sticky notes for understanding of sequencing.

    The teacher will also ask students, “How do you see sequencing in your own life?” in order to help students make deeper connections and to remember the academic language.

    MODIFICATIONS FOR EACH GRADE LEVEL

    MODIFICATIONS FOR EACH GRADE LEVEL

    Each grade level’s math game can be different, depending on what they are learning. In Kindergarten and 1st, students can be shown different representations of numbers and determine what that number is. Or in upper grades, students can be given more challenging concepts such as place value, fractions, etc. This game can be substituted to review any math concept.

    • Math Standard K.NBT.1 Compose and decompose numbers from 11–19 into ten ones and some further ones. Use objects or drawings and record each composition or decomposition by a drawing or equation. For example, 18 = 10 + 8. Understand that these numbers are composed of ten ones and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

    • Math Standard 1.NBT.4 Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens to tens and ones to ones, and that it is sometimes necessary to compose a ten.

    • Math Standard 2.NBT.5 Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

    • Math Standard 4.NBT.4 Fluently add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.

    • Math Standard 5.NBT.5 Fluently multiply multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.

    CITATIONS & RESOURCES