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3-5 Computer Science Curriculum
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SFUSD's creative computing curriculum introduces computer science as a creative, collaborative, and engaging discipline to children in third through fifth grade.

Across 15-20 lessons at each grade level, students will learn about algorithms and programming, computing systems, the Internet, and impacts of computing, while developing strong practices and dispositions. Lessons are designed to be implemented in 45 to 60-minute periods approximately once per week.

Subject:
Information Technology Education
Educational Technology
Computer Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Lesson
Author:
Adapted primarily from Creative Commons licensed resources developed by the ScratchEd team at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and Code.org. See also the original ScratchEd Creative Computing curriculum guide.
Created by the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) Computer Science team: CSinSF.org.
Date Added:
03/21/2019
6.3 Weather, Climate & Water Cycling
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The goals of OpenSciEd are to ensure any science teacher, anywhere, can access and download freely available, high quality, locally adaptable full-course materials. REMOTE LEARNING GUIDE FOR THIS UNIT NOW AVAILABLE!

This unit on weather, climate, and water cycling is broken into four separate lesson sets. In the first two lesson sets, students explain small-scale storms. In the third and fourth lesson sets, students explain mesoscale weather systems and climate-level patterns of precipitation. Each of these two parts of the unit is grounded in a different anchoring phenomenon.

Subject:
Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
OpenSciEd
Author:
OpenSciEd
Date Added:
12/10/2020
AP U.S. Government & Politics
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This course contains five projects that are organized around the following question: “What is the proper role of government in a democracy?” Each project involves political simulations through which students take on roles that help contextualize the content required by the new College Board course framework.Founders' IntentElectionsSupreme CourtCongressGovernment in ActionOpenly licensed PDF unit plans of all the above units are available at this Sprocket Lucas Education Research Platform (scroll to bottom of web page).Alternately, educators may sign up for free access to the online AP U.S. Government and Politics course that includes additional instructional supports:https://sprocket.lucasedresearch.org/users/sprocket_access

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Knowledge in Action
Lucas Education Research
University of Washington
Date Added:
01/15/2019
Abstract Algebra II
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This course is a continuation of Abstract Algebra I: the student will revisit structures like groups, rings, and fields as well as mappings like homomorphisms and isomorphisms. The student will also take a look at ring factorization, general lattices, and vector spaces. Later this course presents more advanced topics, such as Galois theory - one of the most important theories in algebra, but one that requires a thorough understanding of much of the content we will study beforehand. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Compute the sizes of finite groups when certain properties are known about those groups; Identify and manipulate solvable and nilpotent groups; Determine whether a polynomial ring is divisible or not and divide the polynomial (if it is divisible); Determine the basis of a vector space, change bases, and manipulate linear transformations; Define and use the Fundamental Theorem of Invertible Matrices; Use Galois theory to find general solutions of a polynomial over a field. (Mathematics 232)

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Adopting Open Textbooks
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There are many layers when thinking about Open and Open Textbooks. In this first week of the workshop, we'll begin by peeling those layers back, starting with what Open actually means in the context of education. We'll then move on to looking at what an Open Textbook is. We've provided you with some resources to check out, and we ask that you post in the forum to talk to other participants about your experiences with openness.

Subject:
Professional Learning
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
BCcampus
Date Added:
09/23/2017
Advanced Partial Differential Equations with Applications, Fall 2009
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The focus of the course is the concepts and techniques for solving the partial differential equations (PDE) that permeate various scientific disciplines. The emphasis is on nonlinear PDE. Applications include problems from fluid dynamics, electrical and mechanical engineering, materials science, quantum mechanics, etc.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Rosales, Rodolfo R.
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Advanced Statistics
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CC BY
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This course is oriented toward US high school students. The course is divided into 10 units of study. The first five units build the foundation of concepts, vocabulary, knowledge, and skills for success in the remainder of the course. In the final five units, we will take the plunge into the domain of inferential statistics, where we make statistical decisions based on the data that we have collected.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
07/05/2018
The Age of Reason: Europe from the 17th to the Early 19th Centuries, Spring 2011
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This course asks students to consider the ways in which social theorists, institutional reformers, and political revolutionaries in the 17th through 19th centuries seized upon insights developed in the natural sciences and mathematics to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Students study trials, art, literature and music to understand developments in Europe and its colonies in these two centuries. Covers works by Newton, Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau, Marx, and Darwin.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ravel, Jeffrey S.
Date Added:
01/01/2011
The Age of Revolutions in the Atlantic World, 1776-1848
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This course introduces the history of the Age of Revolutions in the Atlantic World from 1776 to 1848. Running alongside and extending beyond these political revolutions is the First Industrial Revolution. The Atlantic World, dominated by European empires in 1776, was transformed through revolution into a series of independent states by 1848, experiencing profound changes through the development and consolidation of capitalism. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: think analytically about the history of the revolutionary age between 1776 and 1848; define what a revolution" means as well as describe what made 1776-1848 an "age of revolution"; define the concept of the Atlantic World and describe its importance in World History; explain the basic intellectual and technical movements associated with the Enlightenment and their relations to the revolutionary movements that follow; identify and describe the causes of the American Revolution; identify and describe the many stages of the French Revolution: the end of absolutist monarchy, the implementation of constitutional monarchy, and the rise of the Jacobin Republic; compare and contrast the Declaration of the Rights of Man and other major statements of the Revolutionary period and Enlightenment thinking; identify and describe the impact of the first successful slave rebellion in world history--the Haitian Revolution; compare and contrast the debate between Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate the causes and effects of the Age of Revolutions. This free course may be completed online at any time. (History 303)

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/29/2018
The Age of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1500-1900
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This course will introduce the student to the history of the Atlantic slave trade from 1500 to 1900. The student will learn about the slave trade, its causes, and its effects on Africa, Europe, and the Americas. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the Atlantic slave trade began as a fledgling enterprise of the English, Portuguese, and Spanish in the 1500s and why, by the mid-eighteenth century, the trade dominated Atlantic societies and economies. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: think analytically about the various meanings of 'slave' and 'slavery' during the age of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'triangular trade' and define the Atlantic World; identify and describe the logic for enslavement of Africans by Europeans; identify and describe the African ethnic groups enslaved by Europeans and those captives' New World destinations; identify and describe the early slaving voyages of the Portuguese and Spanish. Students will also be able to describe how the Dutch and English later inserted themselves into the trade; identify and describe the expansion of the plantation complex in the New World in the 1600s and its impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze the rise of European empires and the parallel expansion of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze slavery within African societies. They will also be able to identify and describe the trans-Saharan slave trade and the Red Sea/Indian Ocean slave trade; identify and describe the nature of the African slave market and principal slaving ports in western Africa; analyze and describe New World slave societies and their impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'Middle Passage' of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the causes for the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade in the nineteenth century; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate all aspects of the Atlantic slave trade. (History 311)

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/29/2018
Agriscience / Intro to Agriculture
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***LOGIN REQUIRED*** The Agriscience/Intro to Agriculture course helps students acquire a broad understanding of a variety of agricultural areas, develop an awareness of the many career opportunities in agriculture, participate in occupationally relevant experiences, and work cooperatively with a group to develop and expand leadership abilities. Students study California agriculture, agricultural business, agricultural technologies, natural resources, and animal, plant, and soil sciences.

Subject:
Agriculture
Material Type:
Full Course
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Butte County Office of Education
Date Added:
01/03/2019
Algebra
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CC BY
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This course discusses how to use algebra for a variety of everyday tasks, such as calculate change without specifying how much money is to be spent on a purchase, analyzing relationships by graphing, and describing real-world situations in business, accounting, and science.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Algebra2Go - Prealgebra
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Prepare yourself to take an Algebra course with the Algebra2go䋢 prealgebra resources page. Whether you are attending Saddleback College's prealgebra class (math 351), taking a prealgebra class at another school, or need to refresh your math skills for a business or science class, Professor Perez and his favorite student Charlie have the tools that can help you. We have five primary types of study materials: class notes, video worksheets, video lectures, practice problems, and practice quizzes. For some topics we have some additional tools to assist you.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Saddleback College
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Author:
Candice Harrington
Larry Perez
Patrick Quigley
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Algebra2go:  Decimals
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Part of the course for community college students featuring Professor Perez and his student Charlie, teaching about decimal concepts and operations.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Provider:
Saddleback College
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Author:
Candice Harrington
Larry Perez
Patrick Quigley
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Algebra2go- PreAlgebra - Intro to Subtraction
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This course is for community college students featuring Professor Perez and his student Charlie. This lesson demonstrates subtraction, including when the answer is negative, on the number line.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Saddleback College
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Author:
Candice Harrington
Larry Perez
Patrick Quigley
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Algebra2go: Pre-algebra Conversions
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This is part of the course for community college students featuring Professor Perez and his student Charlie, teaching how to make conversions between different kinds of units.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Lecture
Unit of Study
Provider:
Saddleback College
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Author:
Candice Harrington
Larry Perez
Patrick Quigley
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Algebra I
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This course is oriented toward US high school students. Its structure and materials are aligned to the US Common Core Standards. Foci include: graphing, equations and inequalities.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Algebra II, Spring 2011
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This undergraduate level course follows Algebra I. Topics include group representations, rings, ideals, fields, polynomial rings, modules, factorization, integers in quadratic number fields, field extensions, and Galois theory.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Artin, Michael
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Algebraic Geometry, Spring 2009
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This course provides an introduction to the language of schemes, properties of morphisms, and sheaf cohomology. Together with 18.725 Algebraic Geometry, students gain an understanding of the basic notions and techniques of modern algebraic geometry.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kedlaya, Kiran
Date Added:
01/01/2009
America in Depression and War, Spring 2012
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This course focuses on the Great Depression and World War II and how they led to a major reordering of American politics and society. We will examine how ordinary people experienced these crises and how those experiences changed their outlook on politics and the world around them.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Meg Jacobs
Date Added:
01/01/2012
American History to 1865, Fall 2010
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This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Maier, Pauline
Date Added:
01/01/2010
American Literature I
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This course is a survey of American Literature from 1650 through 1820. It covers Early American and Puritan Literature, Enlightenment Literature, and Romantic Literature. It teaches in the context of American History and introduces the student to literary criticism and research.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Date Added:
07/05/2018
American Political Thought
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This course will cover American political thought from the nation's founding through the 1960s, exploring the political theories that have shaped its governance. As there is no one philosopher or idea that represents the totality of American political thought, the student will survey the writings and speeches of those who have had the greatest impact over this period of time. Much of the study required in this course is based on the original texts and speeches of those who influenced political thought throughout American history. The student will learn and understand the impact that their views and actions have had on the modern American state. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the religious and political origins of the American political system; explain how Enlightenment thinkers, such as John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Baron de Montesquieu, influenced the political philosophies of American founding fathers; analyze how the colonial American experience shaped many of the core values represented in American government and expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution; compare and contrast the differing opinions on the role of the government that the founders expressed; trace the development and evolution of the concepts of 'states rights' and 'federal (national) supremacy'; connect the observations of De Tocqueville in Democracy in America to the concepts of equality, individuality, and civic engagement in American political discourse; examine the evolution of race in the American political system (from slavery to the 2008 election of Barack Obama); discuss the changes in the political role of women in America from its colonial days to the present; connect the concept of 'American Exceptionalism' to the industrial revolution, capitalism, and imperialism; analyze the roots of reform in the Progressive Era and their impact on modern political discourse; explain major principles of American foreign relations over time; assess the purpose and impact of ĺÎĺĺĺŤAmerican war rhetoricĄ_ĺĺö over time; differentiate between 'liberal' and 'conservative' political beliefs in modern American government; illustrate how the political turmoil in the 1960s greatly shaped contemporary American political discourse; evaluate the current political discourse as represented in the 2008 and 2010 elections. (Political Science 301)

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/29/2018
American Urban History II, Fall 2011
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This is a seminar course that explores the history of selected features of the physical environment of urban America. Among the features considered are parks, cemeteries, tenements, suburbs, zoos, skyscrapers, department stores, supermarkets, and amusement parks. The course gives students experience in working with primary documentation sources through its selection of readings and class discussions. Students then have the opportunity to apply this experience by researching their own historical questions and writing a term paper.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Robert Fogelson
Date Added:
01/01/2011
American Urban History I, Spring 2010
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This course is a seminar on the history of institutions and institutional change in American cities from roughly 1850 to the present. Among the institutions to be looked at are political machines, police departments, courts, schools, prisons, public authorities, and universities. The focus of the course is on readings and discussions.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fogelson, Robert
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Analysis I, Fall 2010
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Analysis I covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: metric spaces, convergence of sequences and series, continuity, differentiability, Riemann integral, sequences and series of functions, uniformity, interchange of limit operations.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wehrheim, Katrin
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Analysis II, Fall 2005
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Continues 18.100, in the direction of manifolds and global analysis. Differentiable maps, inverse and implicit function theorems, n-dimensional Riemann integral, change of variables in multiple integrals, manifolds, differential forms, n-dimensional version of Stokes' theorem. 18.901 helpful but not required.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Guillemin, Victor
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Anatomy and Physiology I
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Includes the study of the gross and microscopic structure of the systems of the human body with special emphasis on the relationship between structure and function. Integrates anatomy and physiology of cells, tissues, organs, the systems of the human body, and mechanisms responsible for homeostasis.

Subject:
Health and Medicine
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Anatomy and Physiology II
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Includes sections on the Endocrine System, the Cardiovascular System, the Lymphatic and Immune System, the Respiratory System, the Digestive System, Nutrition, the Urinary System, the Reproductive System, and Development and Inheritance.

Subject:
Health and Medicine
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Ancient Civilizations of the World
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In this course, the student will study the emergence of the major civilizations of the ancient world, beginning with the Paleolithic Era (about 2.5 million years ago) and finishing with the end of the Middle Ages in fifteenth century A.D. The student will pay special attention to how societies evolved across this expanse of time - from fragmented and primitive agricultural communities to more advanced and consolidated civilizations. By the end of the course, the student will possess a thorough understanding of important overarching social, political, religious, and economic themes in the ancient world, ranging from the emergence of Confucian philosophy in Asia to the fall of imperial Rome. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify and define the world's earliest civilizations, including the Neolithic Revolution, and describe how it shaped the development of these early civilizations; Identify, describe, and compare/contrast the first advanced civilizations in the world - Mesopotamia and Egypt; Identify and describe the emergence of the earliest civilizations in Asia: the Harappan and Aryan societies on the Indian subcontinent and the Shang and Zhou societies in China; Identify and describe the emergence of new philosophies - Daoism and Confucianism - during the Warring States period in China. Identify and describe the subsequent rise of the Qin and Han dynasties; Identify and describe the different periods that characterized ancient Greece - Archaic Greece (or the Greek Dark Ages), classical Greece, and the Hellenistic era; Identify and describe the characteristics of the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic, and Imperial Rome; Analyze the emergence of the Mauryan and Gupta empires during the 'classical age' in India; Identify and analyze the Buddhist and Vedic (Hindu) faiths; Identify and describe the rise of civilizations in the Americas, particularly in Meso and South America; Analyze and describe the rise of Islam in the Middle East; Identify and describe the emergence of the Arab caliphate, the Umayyad dynasty, and Abbasid dynasty; Identify and describe the rise and fall of the Byzantine Empire; Identify and analyze key facets of medieval society in Western EuropeĺÎĺĚ_ĺÜthe Catholic Church, feudalism, and the rise of technology and commerce; Analyze and interpret primary-source documents that elucidate the exchanges and advancements made in civilizations across time and space. (History 101)

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/29/2018
Applied Calculus
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Applied Calculus instructs students in the differential and integral calculus of elementary functions with an emphasis on applications to business, social and life science. Different from a traditional calculus course for engineering, science and math majors, this course does not use trigonometry, nor does it focus on mathematical proofs as an instructional method.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Author:
Dale Hoffman
David Lippman
Shana Calaway
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Applied Geometric Algebra, Spring 2009
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Laszlo Tisza was Professor of Physics Emeritus at MIT, where he began teaching in 1941. This online publication is a reproduction the original lecture notes for the course "Applied Geometric Algebra" taught by Professor Tisza in the Spring of 1976. Over the last 100 years, the mathematical tools employed by physicists have expanded considerably, from differential calculus, vector algebra and geometry, to advanced linear algebra, tensors, Hilbert space, spinors, Group theory and many others. These sophisticated tools provide powerful machinery for describing the physical world, however, their physical interpretation is often not intuitive. These course notes represent Prof. Tisza's attempt at bringing conceptual clarity and unity to the application and interpretation of these advanced mathematical tools. In particular, there is an emphasis on the unifying role that Group theory plays in classical, relativistic, and quantum physics. Prof. Tisza revisits many elementary problems with an advanced treatment in order to help develop the geometrical intuition for the algebraic machinery that may carry over to more advanced problems. The lecture notes came to MIT OpenCourseWare by way of Samuel Gasster, '77 (Course 18), who had taken the course and kept a copy of the lecture notes for his own reference. He dedicated dozens of hours of his own time to convert the typewritten notes into LaTeX files and then publication-ready PDFs. You can read about his motivation for wanting to see these notes published in his Preface below. Professor Tisza kindly gave his permission to make these notes available on MIT OpenCourseWare.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Tisza, L
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Applied Probability
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CC BY-SA
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Focuses on modeling, quantification, and analysis of uncertainty by teaching random variables, simple random processes and their probability distributions, Markov processes, limit theorems, elements of statistical inference, and decision making under uncertainty. This course extends the discrete probability learned in the discrete math class. It focuses on actual applications, and places little emphasis on proofs. A problem set based on identifying tumors using MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) is done using Matlab.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Provider:
ArsDigita University
Provider Set:
ArsDigita University
Author:
Rajeev Surati
Tina Kapur
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Applied Statistics, Spring 2009
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

I designed the course for graduate students who use statistics in their research, plan to use statistics, or need to interpret statistical analyses performed by others. The primary audience are graduate students in the environmental sciences, but the course should benefit just about anyone who is in graduate school in the natural sciences. The course is not designed for those who want a simple overview of statistics; we’ll learn by analyzing real data. This course or equivalent is required for UMB Biology and EEOS Ph.D. students. It is a recommended course for several of the intercampus graduate school of marine science program options.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
UMass Boston
Provider Set:
UMass Boston OpenCourseWare
Author:
Eugene Gallagher
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Arithmetic for College Students
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course is an arithmetic course intended for college students, covering whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, ratios and proportions, geometry, measurement, statistics, and integers using an integrated geometry and statistics approach. The course uses the late integers model—integers are only introduced at the end of the course.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Author:
David Lippman
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Art Appreciation
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course is particularly focused on helping you develop visual literacy skills, but all the college courses you take are to some degree about information literacy. Visual literacy is really just a specialized type of information literacy. The skills you acquire in this course will help you become an effective researcher in other fields, as well.

Subject:
Visual Art
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Art Appreciation and Techniques
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This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history and in depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative processes and thought. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: interpret examples of visual art using a five-step critical process that includes description, analysis, context, meaning, and judgment; identify and describe the elements and principles of art; use analytical skills to connect formal attributes of art with their meaning and expression; explain the role and effect of the visual arts in societies, history, and other world cultures; articulate the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic themes and issues that artists examine in their work; identify the processes and materials involved in art and architectural production; utilize information to locate, evaluate, and communicate information about visual art in its various forms. Note that this course is an alternative to the Saylor FoundationĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s ARTH101A and has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Art History 101B)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
01/03/2019
The Art of Counting, Spring 2003
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CC BY-NC-SA
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The subject of enumerative combinatorics deals with counting the number of elements of a finite set. For instance, the number of ways to write a positive integer n as a sum of positive integers, taking order into account, is 2n-1. We will be concerned primarily with bijective proofs, i.e., showing that two sets have the same number of elements by exhibiting a bijection (one-to-one correspondence) between them. This is a subject which requires little mathematical background to reach the frontiers of current research. Students will therefore have the opportunity to do original research. It might be necessary to limit enrollment.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Stanley, Richard
Date Added:
01/01/2003
The Art of the Probable: Literature and Probability, Spring 2008
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The Art of the Probable" addresses the history of scientific ideas, in particular the emergence and development of mathematical probability. But it is neither meant to be a history of the exact sciences per se nor an annex to, say, the Course 6 curriculum in probability and statistics. Rather, our objective is to focus on the formal, thematic, and rhetorical features that imaginative literature shares with texts in the history of probability. These shared issues include (but are not limited to): the attempt to quantify or otherwise explain the presence of chance, risk, and contingency in everyday life; the deduction of causes for phenomena that are knowable only in their effects; and, above all, the question of what it means to think and act rationally in an uncertain world. Our course therefore aims to broaden students’ appreciation for and understanding of how literature interacts with--both reflecting upon and contributing to--the scientific understanding of the world. We are just as centrally committed to encouraging students to regard imaginative literature as a unique contribution to knowledge in its own right, and to see literary works of art as objects that demand and richly repay close critical analysis. It is our hope that the course will serve students well if they elect to pursue further work in Literature or other discipline in SHASS, and also enrich or complement their understanding of probability and statistics in other scientific and engineering subjects they elect to take.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jackson, Noel
Kibel, Alvin
Raman, Shankar
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Asia in the Modern World: Images & Representations
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We will explore images that pertain to the emergence of Japan as a modern state. We will focus on images that depict Japan as it comes into contact with the rest of the world after its long and deep isolation during the feudal period. We will also cover city planning of Tokyo that took place after WWII, and such topics as the 1964 Tokyo Olympics.

Subject:
History
World Languages
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
High School Highlights
Author:
Shigeru Miyagawa
Date Added:
11/08/2019
Basic Math (BPCC Open Campus Math 097)
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This course is a review of basic mathematics skills. Here's what's covered:
-fundamental numeral operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication
division of whole numbers, fractions, and decimals
-ratio and proportion
-percent
-systems of measurement
-an introduction to geometry
NOTE: Open Campus courses are non-credit reviews and tutorials and cannot be used to satisfy requirements in any curriculum at BPCC. (Basic Mathematics Course by Bossier Parish Community College is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at http://bpcc.edu/opencampus/index.html.)

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Bossier Parish Community College
Author:
Michelle Barnickel
Date Added:
07/05/2018
The Beatles, Lesson 1: The Beatles Work Towards Success
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"A lot of people thought we were an overnight sensation," says The Beatles' Paul McCartney in The Beatles: Eight Days a Week “The Touring Years," "but they were wrong." Indeed, though to many fans The Beatles seem to have been a big bang, bursting from Liverpudlian obscurity to international stardom with their 1963 debut album Please Please Me, quite the opposite is true. Between 1960-63, The Beatles worked. They were, after all, young men from the working classes of Liverpool, a city still recovering from World War II. They worked to earn money for basic necessities, playing pub sets both day and night and performing lengthy residencies in Hamburg, Germany, one of which included a stretch of 104 consecutive shows. They worked on repertoire, learning dozens of "cover" songs spanning several genres. They worked on their group sound, playing several sets a night and fine tuning the skills that helped them "hold" audiences at the dance floor, even those who may not have come specifically to see them.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Music
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
11/08/2019
The Beatles, Lesson 5: The Teamwork Behind the Beatles
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This lesson explores first the role Brian Epstein played in helping craft The Beatles' visual presence, group identity and team unity, the way he helped the group transition from successful nightclub act to international sensation.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Music
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
11/08/2019
The Beatles, Lesson 6: From the Stage to the Studio
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By the end of their 1966 summer tour, The Beatles had grown weary of the live concert setting. Concurrently, they had become increasingly comfortable within, and inspired by the possibilities of the recording studio. In the fall of 1966, in a culminating moment, The Beatles announced that they would no longer tour and would instead focus their creative energy on making records.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Music
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
11/08/2019
Beginning Algebra
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This course is also intended to provide the student with a strong foundation for intermediate algebra and beyond. Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to: simplify and solve linear equations and expressions including problems with absolute values and applications; solve linear inequalities; find equations of lines; and solve application problems; add, subtract, multiply, and divide various types of polynomials; factor polynomials, and simplify square roots; evaluate, simplify, multiply, divide, add, and subtract rational expressions, and solve basic applications of rational expressions. This free course may be completed online at any time. It has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. (Mathematics 001)

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Beginning Algebra (BPCC Open Campus: Math 098)
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

In this beginning algebra course, you'll learn about fundamental operations on real numbers, exponents, solving linear equations and inequalities, applications, functions, graphing linear equations, slope, and systems of linear equations. This course was created by Bossier Parish Community College as part of its MOOC series "Open Campus." NOTE: Open Campus courses are non-credit reviews and tutorials and cannot be used to satisfy requirements in any curriculum at BPCC. (Beginning Algebra Course by Bossier Parish Community College is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://bpcc.edu/opencampus/index.html.)

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Bossier Parish Community College
Author:
Gail Hendrix
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Beginning and Intermediate Algebra
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course covers a range of algebraic topics:  Setting up and solving linear equations, graphing, finding linear relations, solving systems of equations, working with polynomials, factoring, working with rational and radical expressions, solving rational and radical equations, solving quadratic equations, and working with functions.  More importantly, this course is intended to provide you with a solid foundation for the rest of your math courses.  As such, emphasis will be placed on mathematical reasoning, not just memorizing procedures and formulas. There is enough content in this course to cover both beginning and intermediate college-level algebra.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Author:
Tyler Wallace
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Biological Engineering II: Instrumentation and Measurement, Fall 2006
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This course covers sensing and measurement for quantitative molecular/cell/tissue analysis, in terms of genetic, biochemical, and biophysical properties. Methods include light and fluorescence microscopies; electro-mechanical probes such as atomic force microscopy, laser and magnetic traps, and MEMS devices; and the application of statistics, probability and noise analysis to experimental data.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
So, Peter
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Biology I
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

An introduction to biology intended for non-science majors.  Focus areas include chemical foundations, cell structure and division, genetics, and evolution.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Author:
David Fernandez
Leslie Orzetti
Paula Rodgers
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Biology II
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This template course was developed from generally available open educational resources (OER) in use at multiple institutions, drawing mostly from a primary work published by OpenStax College Concepts of Biology, but also including additional open works from various sources as noted in attributions on each page of materials.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Date Added:
07/05/2018
Book 1, Birth of Rock. Chapter 10, Lesson 1: Birth of the American Teenager
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In this lesson, students will investigate how teenagers became a distinct demographic group with its own identity in the postwar years, and, in turn, how their influence helped push Rock and Roll into the mainstream. In so doing, they helped secure Rock and Roll's place as the most important popular music of the 20th century.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Music
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
11/08/2019
Book 1, Birth of Rock. Chapter 10, Lesson 2: Fear of the American Teenager
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This lesson will investigate the role of the media, its influence on young people, and the growing anxiety about teenagers' newfound independence in the 1950s. Students will explore primary source materials related to movies, music, and comic books that impacted teenage culture. Learning about the 1954 Senate Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency, students will read and form opinions on actual congressional testimony. Additional resources will include the trailer for Blackboard Jungle and a 1956 performance of Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers' "I'm Not A Juvenile Delinquent."

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Music
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
11/08/2019
Book 1, Birth of Rock. Chapter 10, Lesson 3: Dion and the Teen Idols
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In this lesson, students will examine the emergence of the teen idols in the late 1950swith a particular focus on Dion and the Belmontsto understand how mainstream culture promoted the image of the "good citizen" teen during an era of increased anxiety surrounding youth culture. Students will listen to recordings of Dion and the Belmonts' "A Teenager in Love," as well as Dion's later recording "The Wanderer," in addition to viewing a 1958 instructional film outlining school dress codes, a 1953 trailer for The Wild One, a selection of teen magazines, and performances by Jerry Lee Lewis and Connie Francis.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Music
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
11/08/2019
Book 1, Birth of Rock. Chapter 10, Lesson 4: Rock and Roll Goes To the Movies
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In this lesson, students assume the role of entertainment industry professionals responsible for marketing a selection of movies from the early Rock and Roll era. Following an examination of trailers, posters, newspaper articles, and the Motion Picture Production Code of 1930, students will present to the class on the various stakeholders that helped shape the way Rock and Roll culture was introduced to mainstream movie audiences in the 1950s.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Music
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
11/08/2019