Author:
Katie Blunt
Subject:
Elementary English Language Arts, Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Lower Elementary, Upper Elementary
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Tags:
  • Goshute
  • Lesson Plan
  • Native American
  • November21
  • License:
    Public Domain Dedication
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Text/HTML

    Coyote and Mouse Make Snow Lesson Plan

    Coyote and Mouse Make Snow Lesson Plan

    Overview

    The students will write a story to activate their prior knowledge. They will then read a story and identify the characters, problems, and solutions within that story. After reading the story, the students will retell it in comic strip form. Possible extensions tie in with the Science Core. This concept map is based on the "Coyote and Mouse Make Snow" story booklet. According to Goshute tradition, Coyote tales should only be told during the wintertime. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
    Lesson Plan Author: Patricia Helquist

    Summary

    The students will write a story to activate their prior knowledge. They will then read a story and identify the characters, problems, and solutions within that story. After reading the story, the students will retell it in comic strip form. Possible extensions tie in with the Science Core.

    • Time frame: 1 class period of 45 minutes
    • Group Size: Large Groups
    • Authors: Patricia Helquist
    • Materials: "Coyote and Mouse Make Snow" for each student (file attached)

    Background for Teachers

    This story should only be told or read during the winter months.

    According to Goshute tradition, Coyote tales should only be told during the winter time. This Goshute story booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.

    The booklet was formatted to be printed and assembled. This means that it does not read well when used electronically because the pages will appear out of order. If a teacher did want to use the booklet in an electronic format, they would be best off screenshotting the pages and arranging them in a slide presentation.

    Step 1 - Goals and Outcomes

    Step 1 Goals and Outcomes

    The students will identify the characters in a story. Students will also identify the problems that those characters face and how they attempt to solve those problems.

    Step 3 - Instruction

    Step 3 Instruction

    See detailed lesson plan (attached file).

    Use the attached worksheets during the lesson.

    Strategies for Diverse Learners: The students can work in groups to read the sections of the text, or the teacher can read it aloud to the students.

    Extensions

    This lesson could be used in conjunction with a unit on gravity. Students could discuss why the mouse did not sink into the snow when he stepped on it. This lesson could also be used with a lesson on precipitation. The story talks about Coyote singing a song to bring the snow; teachers could use this to spur a discussion on the scientific explanation of how it snows.

    Step 4 - Assessments

    Step 4 Assessments

    The students will create a comic strip retelling the story. They should include the characters, their problems, and how they attempted to solve the problems.

    Bibliography

    "Coyote and Mouse Make Snow" Cultural Consultants: Genevieve Fields and Chrissandra Murphy