Author:
Natalie Johnson
Subject:
Art and Architecture
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Level:
Middle School
Tags:
  • animation-with-students
  • navajo
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Audio

    Education Standards

    Retelling the Diné Coyote Stories using Claymations and iMovie

    Retelling the  Diné Coyote Stories using Claymations and iMovie

    Overview

    I teach in the Navajo Nation, majority of my students are Navajo.  I wanted to create claymations using stop-motion retelling the Coyote stories.   

    (Collaborative Effort between the Heritage Language Teacher, English Teacher, and Digital Art Teacher)

    Enduring Understanding:

    Students will have a greater understanding of how to create a stop-motion movie using iMovie, clay, and other materials by retaining Navajo Coyote stories.

     

    Success Criteria:  Students will learn about Coyote Stories from the Heritage Language teacher at Monument Valley High School. Coyote Stories » Navajo Language

    • Student will be able to recognize two historical stop-motion motionRequireds.

    • Students will work collaboratively so that each group member has a different role 

    • Storyboarder - uploads the completed storybook to Classroom

    • The student will be able to complete a storyboard to tell a narrative from a given prompt, including rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution.

    • The student will be able to create a Claymation video. The student will be able to record at least two minutes of stop motion media. 

    • The student will be able to navigate editing features on iMovie to create a video. 

     

    Grades: 7-12 grade

    Requireed time:  180 minutes

    Subject: Language Arts, Visual Arts, Media, Literacy & Navajo Heritage Language

     

    Vocabulary

     

    Animate

    Character

    Plasticine

    Tripod

    Claymation

    Frame

    Edit

    Unity

    Armature

    Prop

    Set

    Storyboard 

    Middle Groud

    Foreground

    Background

    Emphasis


     

    Claymation helps develop essential 21st century skills 

    The process of building claymations helps students develop thinking, collaboration, and creative skills. 

     

    Creativity 

    To produce a claymation project, students must create an original production. They begin with a “blank slate” and translate ideas and their imagination into reality by bringing an inanimate clay character to life through a series of frames. 

     

    Problem Solving 

    The process of building a claymation in the classroom requires students to discuss, experiment, and solve a number of issues such as realizing their goals within a limited number of frames, determining what angle to use to take their pictures, and assessing how lighting and sound can affect the mood of their animation. 

     

    Self-Directed Learning

    Student teams work autonomously on a claymation project while you facilitate. Students must ask questions; determine what they know and don’t know, and consult “experts” on their team or on other teams. 

     

    Teamwork and Collaboration 

    While working in collaborative groups, students encounter a variety of perspectives that often require them to revise their thinking and change project direction as well as take different ideas from their team members and combine them into a single effective project. As they plan and execute their project, students decide on goals for their animation and divide up tasks within their team to create characters, backgrounds, and soundtracks that communicate their ideas. They assign roles to members of their team by assessing abilities and exploring their own learning styles and skills. 

     

    Organization 

    While producing claymation, students must determine how best to transform their team’s vision into reality, work with limited time and resources, choose the length of the animation, and adjust the content to meet goals and deadlines. Students must share hardware and software resources with other student teams, develop a plan of action for their own team based on time and resources limitations, as well as determining a schedule that fits everyone’s needs. 

     

    STEPS

    1.  Research

    Remembering; Comprehend: Analyze innovation in art through historical and cultural context

    Students will learn about the history of Stop-motion.  The History of Stop Motion – In A Nutshell.  Then we will discuss the works of The Master of Animation; Ray Harryhausen and Tim Burton.

     

    Students will also research stories about Coyote Stories and how to apply the Navajo Language into the script.

     

     

    1. Design

    Pre-production:  Assigning teams and roles for Stop Motion film creation. 

    The English teacher and Heritage Language teacher will help students to write their scripts.  They will write their scripts in English and in Navajo Diné language.   Students will be creating sketches, plans, and models to create their scenes and characters for their stopmotion story about the Diné Coyote Stories.

     

    Storyboarder - uploads the completed storyboard to the pads using A MUST SEE! How to Draw a Storyboard on iPad Pro!!  There are templates attached to the youtube video.

    Scriptwriting - uploads the completed script to Classroom - How to Write a Script (Format): Making an Animated Movie (#2)

    Producer - write a note listing your materials needed and group progress. ***see 3-D print link below ***

    Director - write a note in Classroom with the software

     

    12 Principles of Animation

    Understand Disney's 12 principles of animation

    5 Tips for Better Stop-Motion Animation | Brickfilm Tutorial

     

    Create Claymations Scenes

    1.  Prototype

    HOW TO MAKE A CLAYMATION | | For Beginners!

     

    iMovie

    Creating; Create: Demonstrate competency in traditional and new art media, and apply appropriate and available technology to express ideas

    Students will following the instructions from the following videos:

    iMovie Stop-Motion Tutorial (Part 1)

    iMovie Stop-Motion Tutorial (Part 2) Green Screen, Picture in a Picture and more!

     iMovie Stop Motion Tutorial | Colour Correction, Audio Editing, Stabilize Video

     

    1. Test

    Creating; Create: Assess and produce art with various materials and methods

    Students will research various ways to create the characters, set, and other objects in the scenes.  

     

    1. Get Feedback

    Students will present their claymation video to their classmates and get feedback.

     

    1. Iterate

    Students will make changes or improvements to their claymation stories.


     

    A rubric can help you assess the final claymation as well as learning that occurred during the claymation-building process.

     

    Criteria 

    Novice

    Apprentice 

    Proficient 

    Distinguished

    Animation meets its purpose and skillfully answers the question posed.

    Subject knowledge is not evident. Information is confusing. Does not answer the essential question. 

    Some subject knowledge is evident. Some information is confusing. Question is stated but not clearly answered. 

    Subject knowledge is evident in much of the product. Information is clear, appropriate, and correct. The essential question is answered. 

    The project has gone above and beyond. All information is clear, appropriate, and correct. The essential question is clearly answered. Subject knowledge is evident throughout.

    Quality of Design. Is it visually pleasing, original, creative, or organized? 

    Quality is weak. There is no evidence of logical flow or use of new ideas. No visual impact. 

    Random presentation of material with little attention paid to quality. 

    The media used demonstrates adequate and clear sequencing of material using creative graphics. 

    The media shows superior evidence of continuity. There is a logical intuitive sequence of information

    Storyboarding and planning 

    Did not utilize storyboard during process or storyboard is incomplete. 

    Basic storyboard. Does not answer the essential question. Referred to storyboard during the project building process. 

    Strong storyboard that answers the essential question. Storyboard used as a guideline for project development. 

    Fully developed storyboard that answers the question and is organized incoherent pieces. Used storyboard extensively during project development for goalsetting, organization

    Presentation style including, eye contact, voice, and appearance 

    No eye contact. Low, soft, or monotone voice. Script reading. Appearance is too casual or sloppy. The posture is slouched. 

    Some eye contact. Voice is soft or monotone. Appearance is casual but neat. Presenter rocks back and forth. 

    Some eye contact, but only in one direction. Voice is steady and clear. The presenter shows some facial expressions, uses appropriate gestures, and knows the content well. A presenter is dressed up and has good posture. 

    Eye contact moves among the audience. The presenter is confident, expressive, and knows their content. They are dressed up or inappropriate costumes. They have good posture, are mobile, and use facial expressions and gestures to make their point.

         
         

    Enduring Understanding:

    Students will have a greater understanding of how to create a stop-motion movie using iMovie, clay, and other materials by retaining Navajo Coyote stories.

     

    Success Criteria:  Students will learn about Coyote Stories from the Heritage Language teacher at Monument Valley High School. Coyote Stories » Navajo Language

    • Student will be able to recognize two historical stop-motion motionRequireds.

    • Students will work collaboratively so that each group member has a different role 

    • Storyboarder - uploads the completed storybook to Classroom

    • The student will be able to complete a storyboard to tell a narrative from a given prompt, including rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution.

    • The student will be able to create a Claymation video. The student will be able to record at least two minutes of stop motion media. 

    • The student will be able to navigate editing features on iMovie to create a video. 

     

    Grades: 7-12 grade

    Requireed time:  180 minutes

    Subject: Language Arts, Visual Arts, Media, Literacy & Navajo Heritage Language

     

    Vocabulary

     

    Animate

    Character

    Plasticine

    Tripod

    Claymation

    Frame

    Edit

    Unity

    Armature

    Prop

    Set

    Storyboard 

    Middle Groud

    Foreground

    Background

    Emphasis


     

    Claymation helps develop essential 21st century skills 

    The process of building claymations helps students develop thinking, collaboration, and creative skills. 

     

    Creativity 

    To produce a claymation project, students must create an original production. They begin with a “blank slate” and translate ideas and their imagination into reality by bringing an inanimate clay character to life through a series of frames. 

     

    Problem Solving 

    The process of building a claymation in the classroom requires students to discuss, experiment, and solve a number of issues such as realizing their goals within a limited number of frames, determining what angle to use to take their pictures, and assessing how lighting and sound can affect the mood of their animation. 

     

    Self-Directed Learning

    Student teams work autonomously on a claymation project while you facilitate. Students must ask questions; determine what they know and don’t know, and consult “experts” on their team or on other teams. 

     

    Teamwork and Collaboration 

    While working in collaborative groups, students encounter a variety of perspectives that often require them to revise their thinking and change project direction as well as take different ideas from their team members and combine them into a single effective project. As they plan and execute their project, students decide on goals for their animation and divide up tasks within their team to create characters, backgrounds, and soundtracks that communicate their ideas. They assign roles to members of their team by assessing abilities and exploring their own learning styles and skills. 

     

    Organization 

    While producing claymation, students must determine how best to transform their team’s vision into reality, work with limited time and resources, choose the length of the animation, and adjust the content to meet goals and deadlines. Students must share hardware and software resources with other student teams, develop a plan of action for their own team based on time and resources limitations, as well as determining a schedule that fits everyone’s needs. 

     

    STEPS

    1.  Research

    Remembering; Comprehend: Analyze innovation in art through historical and cultural context

    Students will learn about the history of Stop-motion.  The History of Stop Motion – In A Nutshell.  Then we will discuss the works of The Master of Animation; Ray Harryhausen and Tim Burton.

     

    Students will also research stories about Coyote Stories and how to apply the Navajo Language into the script.

     

     

    1. Design

    Pre-production:  Assigning teams and roles for Stop Motion film creation. 

    The English teacher and Heritage Language teacher will help students to write their scripts.  They will write their scripts in English and in Navajo Diné language.   Students will be creating sketches, plans, and models to create their scenes and characters for their stopmotion story about the Diné Coyote Stories.

     

    Storyboarder - uploads the completed storyboard to the pads using A MUST SEE! How to Draw a Storyboard on iPad Pro!!  There are templates attached to the youtube video.

    Scriptwriting - uploads the completed script to Classroom - How to Write a Script (Format): Making an Animated Movie (#2)

    Producer - write a note listing your materials needed and group progress. ***see 3-D print link below ***

    Director - write a note in Classroom with the software

     

    12 Principles of Animation

    Understand Disney's 12 principles of animation

    5 Tips for Better Stop-Motion Animation | Brickfilm Tutorial

     

    Create Claymations Scenes

    1.  Prototype

    HOW TO MAKE A CLAYMATION | | For Beginners!

     

    iMovie

    Creating; Create: Demonstrate competency in traditional and new art media, and apply appropriate and available technology to express ideas

    Students will following the instructions from the following videos:

    iMovie Stop-Motion Tutorial (Part 1)

    iMovie Stop-Motion Tutorial (Part 2) Green Screen, Picture in a Picture and more!

     iMovie Stop Motion Tutorial | Colour Correction, Audio Editing, Stabilize Video

     

    1. Test

    Creating; Create: Assess and produce art with various materials and methods

    Students will research various ways to create the characters, set, and other objects in the scenes.  

     

    1. Get Feedback

    Students will present their claymation video to their classmates and get feedback.

     

    1. Iterate

    Students will make changes or improvements to their claymation stories.


     

    A rubric can help you assess the final claymation as well as learning that occurred during the claymation-building process.

     

    Criteria 

    Novice

    Apprentice 

    Proficient 

    Distinguished

    Animation meets its purpose and skillfully answers the question posed.

    Subject knowledge is not evident. Information is confusing. Does not answer the essential question. 

    Some subject knowledge is evident. Some information is confusing. Question is stated but not clearly answered. 

    Subject knowledge is evident in much of the product. Information is clear, appropriate, and correct. The essential question is answered. 

    The project has gone above and beyond. All information is clear, appropriate, and correct. The essential question is clearly answered. Subject knowledge is evident throughout.

    Quality of Design. Is it visually pleasing, original, creative, or organized? 

    Quality is weak. There is no evidence of logical flow or use of new ideas. No visual impact. 

    Random presentation of material with little attention paid to quality. 

    The media used demonstrates adequate and clear sequencing of material using creative graphics. 

    The media shows superior evidence of continuity. There is a logical intuitive sequence of information

    Storyboarding and planning 

    Did not utilize storyboard during process or storyboard is incomplete. 

    Basic storyboard. Does not answer the essential question. Referred to storyboard during the project building process. 

    Strong storyboard that answers the essential question. Storyboard used as a guideline for project development. 

    Fully developed storyboard that answers the question and is organized incoherent pieces. Used storyboard extensively during project development for goalsetting, organization

    Presentation style including, eye contact, voice, and appearance 

    No eye contact. Low, soft, or monotone voice. Script reading. Appearance is too casual or sloppy. The posture is slouched. 

    Some eye contact. Voice is soft or monotone. Appearance is casual but neat. Presenter rocks back and forth. 

    Some eye contact, but only in one direction. Voice is steady and clear. The presenter shows some facial expressions, uses appropriate gestures, and knows the content well. A presenter is dressed up and has good posture. 

    Eye contact moves among the audience. The presenter is confident, expressive, and knows their content. They are dressed up or inappropriate costumes. They have good posture, are mobile, and use facial expressions and gestures to make their point.