Author:
David
Subject:
Elementary English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab, Assessment, Homework/Assignment, Lesson, Lesson Plan, Reading
Level:
Upper Elementary
Tags:
  • Lesson Plan
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs, Text/HTML

    Education Standards

    Book Trailers

    Book Trailers

    Overview

    Getting students to read is not always easy. The teacher chooses one of their favorite books and shares it with students is an excellent way to get them excited about reading. Tell them why it is one of your favorite books. In this lesson, students will explore character, plot, and theme and learn to write persuasively as they develop a movie-style trailer for a book they have read.

    Image information

    Summary

    Getting students to read is not always easy. The teacher chooses one of their favorite books and shares it with students is an excellent way to get them excited about reading. Tell them why it is one of your favorite books. In this lesson, students will explore character, plot, and theme and learn to write persuasively as they develop a movie-style trailer for a book they have read.

    • 45-60 minutes
    • Format - synchronous, face-to-face, and asynchronous

     

    Background for Teachers

    To teach this lesson, you will need an understanding of...

    • Wixie or I-Movies to create a book talk in the form of a movie trailer
    • Character, plot, and theme in books
    • How to write persuasively
    • How to use a digital camera
    • How to hook a device to a projector to present the finished projects

     

    Step 1 - Goals and Outcomes

    Step 1 Goals and Outcomes

    Learning Intentions:

    • Students will be able to...
      • have the knowledge to create a book trailer using a digital camera
      • import video, music, sounds, and pictures into the book trailer
      • create an entertaining and knowledgeable trailer to present to the class that shows collaboration, creativity, and understanding of the curriculum

    Success Criteria:

    • Students will...
      • be able to explain what gets them excited about reading. Is it the characters? Is it the setting, an exciting plot, interesting themes, or a personal connection with the story?
      • will describe the positive and negative emotions other book trailers gave them and if they would be interested in reading the book.

     

    Step 2 - Planning Instruction

    Step 2 Planning Instruction

    Student Background Knowledge

    Before this lesson, students will need to understand books' characters, plots, and themes. They also need a basic understanding of how to write persuasively. Students need to be able to read books and complete a book review of the book they choose for the book trailer.

    Strategies for Diverse Learners

    Life skills will be accommodated as necessary. Accommodations may include but are not limited to:

    • the use of assisted listening devices
    • extra time to complete the task
    • gestures
    • shortening the length of the task
    • peer assistance and/or teacher assistance
    • visuals
    • step-by-step instruction

    English Language Learners will be accommodated as necessary. Accommodations may include but are not limited to:

    • visual aids
    • step-by-step instructions
    • teacher assistance
    • extra time to complete the task
    • gestures
    • teacher and/or peer assistance
    • work independently

    Advanced learners will be accommodated as necessary. Accommodations may include but are not limited to:

    • complete tasks independently
    • serve as team leaders
    • model skills
    • assisting peers with tasks

    Step 3 - Instruction

    Step 3 Instruction

    Instructional procedures: 

    Getting students to read is not easy. Choose one of your favorite books and share it with your students in a way you think will get them excited about reading it. Then, tell why it is your favorite book.

    Ask students what gets them excited about reading. Is it the characters? Is it the setting, an exciting plot, interesting themes, or a personal connection with the story?

    Let your students know they will use Wixie or I-Movie to create a book trailer to promote one of their favorite books.

    First, have students determine which book they want to promote. Then, have them answer the following questions using the book review:

    • Have I read another book by the same author?
    • Did I like it as much as this book?
    • What genre is this book?
    • Is this book part of a series?
    • Do I have a personal connection to this book?

    Students need to be able to identify the theme. Themes are the fundamental, often universal ideas explored in literary works. The big ideas, like friendship, love, and courage. For example, when a character stands up for a friend in a story, we can infer from their actions that friendship and courage are themes in the story.

    Common themes to look for in books include:

    • Friendship
    • Love
    • Cooperation
    • Courage
    • Loyalty
    • Determination
    • Fairness 
    • Anger
    • Being different

    Next, as a class, explore how authors use themes to guide their writing. Ask students to reread important parts of the book and take notes as they analyze the book's characters, settings, and plot to determine the theme. The main character's actions are a great place to look for the theme. 

    Students will use gather information to develop their book trailer using a graphic organizer to help show the central theme of the books as well as events in the story that relates to the theme.

    Next, students will prepare a script for their book trailer. An exciting script should include the following:

    • That is an interesting hook.
    • A vivid description of an event that supports the theme.
    • The title and name of the author are at the conclusion.
    • A call to action.

    Remind students that showing the story is more effective than trying to retell the story. As they write the script, have them think of a movie trailer. Their goal is to leave the viewer with a compelling reason for checking out the book.

    After completing the script, students need to have a storyboard or map of their vision. The storyboard should include information about which portion of the book the trailer will include and what images and sounds will be used to support it. When the storyboard is complete, students start to gather images, music, and sound effects to support their vision.

    Have students use Wixie or I-Movie to create their trailer. They should record their script and add sound effects or background music to match the tone and purpose of the trailer. 

    In this section, you will include your instructional procedures. Be sure to incorporate student agency, customized supports, and opportunities to read, write, speak, and listen while providing multiple opportunities to show mastery over time.

    Students will share their book trailers with the rest of the class to encourage others to read the books. Share the book trailers with the librarian so they may show the trailers in the library as other classes come in for their scheduled library time. 

    Examples for students to watch:

    Out of My Mind - Book Trailer
    Saving Zasha - Book Trailer
    Freckle Juice - Book Trailer

     

    Step 4 - Assessments

    Step 4 Assessments

    The summative assessment for the lesson will be the book trailer students created. The teacher will use the attached rubric to grade the project, and students will also grade their project using the attached final student rubric.

     

    Teacher Rubric

    Student Rubric