Author:
Mykel Johnson
Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Lower Elementary
Tags:
  • Fall
  • First Grade
  • Lesson Plan
  • Seasons
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Third Grade
  • UEN
  • Winter
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs

    Education Standards

    Name that Season!*

    Name that Season!*

    Overview

    This is a lesson about the 4 seasons. The goal is for students to learn the identifying characteristics and names of all four seasons. This lesson incorporates stories, songs, and hands-on activities to learn about all four seasons. This lesson is adaptable and includes accommodation ideas to meet student needs. This lesson will take approximately 80 minutes. 

    Summary

    Students will be able to identify characteristics of all 4 seasons as they read about, explore, discuss, and observe the seasons. This lesson can be adapted to best fit your learners, and allows for accommodations. 

    Materials

    Materials needed are: 

    • silhouettes of a flower, leaf, snowman, and boat

    • 4 chart papers each labeled for 1 of the 4 seasons (Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall)

    • Sun & Earth Model

    • Globe

    • Markers

    • Pictures (picture sort)

    • Flashlight 

    • Picture sort assessment

    • Projector & Speakers

    • Computer

    Background for Teachers

    Students have the prerequisite math skills of measurement of days, weeks, months, and years in relation to the calendar. Students have basic prerequisite skills with weather and temperature.  

    Resources:

    Use of Technology:

    The projector, computer, and speakers are used to project the Jack Hartmann: Four Seasons Song onto the projector screen for the class to see and listen to. 

    In this lesson, I refer to the use of "caught ya" tickets. These are carnival tickets used in my classroom given to students when they are caught doing a good job, being on task, and working diligently. These are turned in for a chance to win a prize from the prize bin on Fridays. This can be altered to whatever classroom management you use in your classroom. 

    This lesson could be broken into multiple days if better suited for your students and schedule. It could be structured like the following or be flexible to meet your classroom needs:

    Day 1: Exploration & Modeling sections (20 mins)

    Day 2: Guided Practice (25 minutes)

    Day 3: Independent Student Practice & Closing Procedures (35 minutes)

    Student Prior Knowledge

    Students have the prerequisite math skills of measurement of days, weeks, months, and years in relation to the calendar. Students have basic prerequisite skills with weather and temperature.  

    Intended Learning Outcomes

    Students will be able to identify characteristics of all 4 seasons as they read about, explore, discuss, and observe the seasons (spring, summer, fall, and winter). 

     

    I have attached the success criteria/rubric for the summative assessment which outlines what is expected of the student to be able to do at the end of this lesson. 

    Instructional Procedures

    The instructional strategies utilized in this lesson include guided practice and direct instruction.

     

     A word bank could be given to students for this section if you choose. The word bank could include the following words & be altered to your liking: 

    Spring, summer, winter, fall, leaves, rain, snow, flowers, hot, cold, warm, cool, rotation, change of colors, ice, blooming, green

     Exploration: 10 minutes

    ·   Today we are going to talk about the 4 seasons. The 4 seasons' names are spring, summer, fall, and winter.  I am going to give you a paper with 4 pictures on it. Each picture represents a season. I want to think on your own which season each picture represents, then with your elbow partner “think out loud” and tell them which season you think each picture represents. 

    Observe students & their knowledge of the seasons. Take notes on students' discussions, level of understanding, etc. This will serve as a formative assessment prior to beginning the lesson. 

    Modeling:  10 minutes

    ·     Using the same pictures the students used- I will then place each picture on the correct season chart paper (hung on the whiteboard). 

    ·  I will then define each of the seasons. 

    Winter: is the coldest part of the year. It usually is the months of December, January, and February. 

    Spring: is when plants and trees begin to appear and bloom. Spring is in between winter and summer and is typically the months of March, April, and May.

    Summer: is the warmest part of the year. It usually is the months of June, July, and August. 

    Fall: Also known as autumn. This is when temperatures begin to cool down from the summer. The leaves begin to fall off the tree. This is the time when fruits are usually ripe and gathered from trees. It is usually the months of September, October, and November.

    ·  I will then use pictures of each season and paste them to the correct chart paper for the season shown within the picture. I will then pass out a picture to each student to place on the season charts. The student will take their picture to the chart paper of the season they believe their picture represents. (I just use random pictures I have cut out from magazines over the years & kept that represent each season. You could also print images from the internet.)

    ·  After placing my picture on the chart paper, I will “think out loud” to reason why I believe that the given season is being shown within the picture. 

    ·  Repeat for each picture (1 per season). 

    Guided Practice: 25 minutes

    ·  Pass out pictures, one per student. (Again just using the pictures cut from magazines over the years)

    ·  Each student will look at their picture & decide which season it belongs to. 

    ·  Turn & Talk with your elbow partner and explain your reasoning for the season your picture shows. 

    ·  Once you have talked with your elbow partner you may take your picture up to the board to put it on the correct season chart paper. 

    ·  Once everyone is done, as a class go through each picture and discuss why it is in the correct spot. Use this as an opportunity for a formative assessment, as students discuss their reasoning for their picture. This is also an opportunity to clear up any confusion or misunderstandings about each season. 

    ·  Have a discussion about “how do the seasons change?” “How does the earth know when it is time for each of the seasons?”

    ·  Then, read the first 2 pages of "The Reason for Seasons" by Gail Gibbons. Explain how the earth is surrounded by air and this air is warmed by the sun. The tilt of the earth as it moves around the sun causes the seasons. 

    ·  Watch this Crash Course Kids video which explains how the Earth's rotation around the sun affects the seasons! 

    Seasons and the Sun: Crash Course Kids 11.1

    ·  Read the next 2 pages of  "The Reason for Seasons" by Gail Gibbons. This discusses how the earth rotates and moves around the sun. This means that half the earth is dark and the other half is in the sun. The earth rotates once per day. The earth is tilted which means the top and bottom of the earth have different seasons. Discuss how the different hemispheres have opposite seasons. 

     Independent Student Practice: 15 minutes

    ·  The students will choose one of the characteristics of each season from the chart. Each student will draw/color and write the subtitle telling about the characteristic of the season they drew. 

    ·  *Award less motivated students with a “caught ya” ticket once they have completed the task. 

    ·  (Fast finishers: Search for seasons in a book & record the season and a justification). 

     Closing Procedure: 20 minutes

    ·      "Ok friends. We are going to watch a video of a song about the seasons. 

    “The Four Seasons Song” by Jack Hartmann: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iisj2kTZIFs

    ·      Hand out the post-assessment (summative) where students will tell details about each of the 4 seasons or draw pictures of what the season is like. (3-5 details about each season)

    ·      Give students the rest of the time to finish the assessment and turn it in.

    If student finish early have them write using the following prompt in their writing journals "My favorite season is ________ because____________".

    Strategies for Diverse Learners

    During independent practice time:

    ·  *Award less motivated students with a “caught ya” ticket once they have completed the task. 

    ·  (Fast finishers: Search for seasons in a book & record the season and a justification). 

     

    Possible accommodations that could be made based on students' needs: extra time, assistance with reading, partner or teacher help, language translation

    Extensions

    Extenstions could include building a model of one of the four seasons, or finding the seasons represented in a piece of literature.

    Assessment Plan

    Pre lesson: Observe students & their knowledge of the seasons during the exploration portion of the lesson. Take notes on students' discussions, level of understanding, etc. This will serve as a formative assessment prior to beginning the lesson. 

     

    Summative assessment: Hand out the post-assessment (summative) where students will tell details about each of the 4 seasons or draw pictures of what the season is like. (3-5 details about each season)

    Rubrics

    The summative season rubric is attached for the summative assessment.

    Author(s)

    I am the author of this lesson. I created the images, assessments, and rubric for this lesson.