Author:
Sarah Ainzley
Subject:
Dance, Literature, Music
Material Type:
Assessment, Interactive, Reading
Level:
Lower Elementary
Tags:
  • Expression
  • Fluency
  • Lesson Plan
  • Movement
  • Music
  • Patterns
  • Reading
  • Technology
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Text/HTML

    Education Standards

    Don't Read Like a Robot!

    Don't Read Like a Robot!

    Overview

    This is a lesson plan template created to engage young readers and encourage students to read fluently. Produced for 1st grade students, in a face-to-face setting. It can be completed in two 30 minute chuncks in one day, or across two days. The purpose of this lesson is to build a greater love for reading in each student. Reading with expression can aid in reading fluency and comprehension. You will be using dance along videos and engaging songs to introduce fluency. Students will create individual projects and be provided with opportunities to work with a partner to assess their learning. Instructions to incude diverse learners are included in section 1, 4, 5 and 6. 

    What's in the Lesson?

    (The Thumbnail image was created by me in Google Drawings)

     

    This lesson is produced for 1st grade students, in a face-to-face setting. It can be completed in two 30 minute chuncks in one day, or across two days. The purpose of this lesson is to build a greater love for reading in each student. Reading with expression can aid in reading fluency and comprehension. 

    In this lesson students will learn from several examples of expression, and sticking to a rythum when they read. Using GarageBand, an app on student iPads, students will be encouraged to listen and interact with instruments. The purpose of this lesson is to use rythum and patterns to excite students about reading with expression. Students will be expected to create a 2:00 minute song on GarageBand. 

    Student progress will be measured through DYAD reading. Students will read grad-levle text with a partner using fluency strategies to build expression into their reading. Teacher will walk around the room, using proximity to determine students who are grasping the expression concept. Diverse learners will be provided the opportunity to work with more fluent readers and provided differentiation in the text that they are reading. 

    What You Need to Know Before You Start the Lesson

    You will be moving around alot in this lesson. Students will go from listening to a story read aloud, to dancing along to sounds, creating their own music, to reading with a partner. You will need your favorite read aloud. What book can you read aloud to your class in a mono tone, robotic voice. Choose your book! Any book...but you must read it like a robot! 

    In our classroom, I like to read the book "Weird Parents" by Audrey Wood. This has been my favorite book since I was young, so I like to read it to students using my best robot voice. At the end of the lesson, you will read the same book again, but using expression.

    You will need to partner your students into pairs of two. Pair High students with medium students an medium students with low students. This way there isnt a huge gap in the partnerships, and they can follow along with eachother more closley. Here is an expmple of how DYAD reading is done in a classroom. The dyad reading method is one way of reading with your child that is research based and shown to help students grow in their reading abilities.

    Before teaching this lesson, you will want to have an understanding of how GarageBand works. The instruments students can play on , as well as expectations that need to be set before letting students play around on the app. 

    The following resources will be used for this lesson. Opening the links and having tabs up on your computer can help move your lesson more smoothly. 

    • Listen and Move- Play this aloud. The video will instruct students to move according to sounds being made. 
    • Don't Read Like a Robot- This is a fun YouTube Video that demonstrates a story being read like a robot, and how much more exciting the story can be when you "Read with Expression!". Students can dance along to this video as they listen. It is very engaging! Can be a great brain break too!
    • GarageBand.- This is the link where you can access the Apple GarageBand. If you do not have access to GarageBand, then students can make their own instruments in class. This activity would need to be done ahead of time so that the instruments are ready to be played when you are giving this lesson. 

    Goals for the Lesson

    Learning Intentions:

    • Students will be able to recognize steady beat, repeating patterns, and expressive elements. Students will use these skills to fluentlry read grade-level text orally, with accuracy, approproate rate, and expression.

    Success Criteria:

    • Students will demonstrate ways to read with expression. Students will identify the importance of reading with expression.

    Standard 1: M.R.1: Listen to and interact with a vaiety of contrasting music while recognizing steady beat, repeating patterns, and expressive elements. 

    CCSS.ELA.- Literacy.R.F.1.4.B: Students must read grade-levle text orally with accuracy, approriate rate, and expression. 

    Instructions

     

    • Prior to this lesson, students will need to have an understanding of patterns as well as expsure to  reading fluency strategies. 
    • The goal of this lesson is for students to create a 2:00 minute song with rythu and patterns on GarageBand. 
    1. To activate student learning, read aloud to your class a story that they have heard before (Weird Parents By: Audrey Wood). Read the story aloud in a robotic, monotone voice so the students can see that without expression a story may not be as exciting. Or without expression it may be more difficult to understand what is going on in the text. 
    2. Have a discussion with your class about Expression and how reading with expression can make stories more interesting. Using expression can build reading fluency and it can help us comprehend what we are reading. Give examples like shouting out an emerency without using expression. Or tell a student how much you love thier shirt, without using expression. Challenge students to share something, using expression with their neighbor. 
    3. To introduce a story using expression and rythum, play Don't Read Like a Robot
      1. This is a fun YouTube Video that demonstrates a story being read like a robot, and how much more exciting the story can be when you "Read with Expression!". Students can dance along to this video as they listen. It is very engaging! Can be a great brain break too!
    4. Pair students into DYAD partners where they will read aloud  in partnerships using expression. As students are reading with their partners, walk around and assess whether or not students are using expression while they read. 
      1. For students who are struggling to read with expressoin. Sit with them and read thier book aloud using examples of expressoins so that students can see and hear the appropriate way to read their book with expression. Encourage them to copy this a few times before mastery. 
      2. For students who are reading using expression, they are ready for GarageBand.
      3. For diverse learners during DYAD reading, teacher can provide the opportunity to read with the student on a seperate passage, or sit with the student as they are reading with a more fluent reader. 

    Free Exploration- Where Students Can Create Their Own Work

    In this sections, students get to create their music. Allow students enough time to brainstrom, explore, and create. The goal is to create a  2:00 minute song using the drums and their voice.Students will be working in their own space, on their own iPads. 

    Students will need their headphones, and their iPads.

    In the settings app, make sure iPad is allowing access to the microphone, through GarageBand. 

    1. Students will log onto GarageBand to start creating.
      1. Creat a New Song by clicking the + button
      2. Choose Drummer Tracks and choose acoustic drums
        1. (If drums do not open automatically, follow these steps) The Yellow at the top will indicate a default of 8 bars. 8 bars = 1 section. Rather than build a song with sections. To Simplify, first grade students will just create a song, with audio and a rythum.
          1. Click the + sigh a the end of the first 8 sections to open a drop down bar. 
          2. Select automatic  so that students can record themselves on a mic, recording and playing.
    2. Students are ready to create: Open the drums, choose acoustic, and select what type of aucoustic drums to use. Ex: bluebird, brooklyn, classic studio kit...
      1. Diverse Learners: For students in your classroom who are unfamiliar with the instruments on GarageBand, pair these students with a student who is able to work independently on their iPad. Allow your ELL students to observe and experiment with the instruments on a peers iPad first. Letting students work in parters for this will open oportunity for students to create more sound within their project. Students can choose to work together for the entire project, or experiment with the iPad tools, then move to an independent project. 
    3. Brainstorm: Play around on the drums and gain an understanding of what the instrument sounds like on a device. This is a time for free exploration where students can create and have fun while getting comfortable with the GarageBand app.
    4. When you are ready to create a pattern, or you have mastered a pattern that sounds exciting, select record at the top of the screen and perform!
    5. Adding voice is optional. 
      1. Diverse Learners: If an ELL student chooses to add voice to their project, encourage their creativity. The music that they are familiar with may sound different than their peers. This would be a great opportunity to integrate Social Studies into your lesson.
        1. Allow ELL students to demonstrate examples of music from their culture. Compare the similarities and differences. Ask questions like "Do other cltures have patterns within their music?" "What makes these patterens different or similar to the patterns in the music you are creating?"
    6. Challenge studnet sto create a pattern. something that repeats itsself over and over. Too much drumming can make it difficult to hear the rhythum clearly. 

    Once all students have finished their musical piece. Allow time for students to share their creations. 

    Option 1: A gallery walk. During a gallery walk students can walk around from iPad to iPad listening to thier peers creations.

    Option 2: Pair students up to listen to a neighbors creation, limiting it to 1 listen per peer. 

    Revisit with your class and compare students creations. What do you feel when you hear this song? When you hear this song do you want to jump, or slide, or lay down, or hop? Talk about the movements animals might make if moving to this song. Ask students questions that are going to encourage them to think outside of the concepts. Realate expression and patterns to the outside world. 

    Assess

    Although informal assessments have happened troughout this lesson, in this section, you will continue to assess student learning through observation. Observation during dyad reading and observation during GarageBand creations. 

    1. As students are reading with their dyad partners, walk around and assess whether or not students are using expression while they read. How can their expressions change? How can you model appropriate expression for students who are struggling. Sit with them and read thier book aloud using examples of expressoins so that students can see and hear the appropriate way to read their book with expression. Encourage them to copy this a few times before returning to partner reading. . 
    2. Students who are using expression and reading as partners, you can ask them to read their story in front of the class. Or maybe just one student wants to read in front of the class. It is great for students to hear their peers succeed so that they see it is possible.

    Another opportunity to assess student progress:

    1. Monitor students as they are creating thier music. Are they sticking to a pettern in their music? Can you hear a rhythum withing their music? How can you guide them to simplyfing their creation?
    2. Allow students to share their work at the end of their work period. Students will be thrilled to share their work with their peers and to compare their patterns with others creations.

    Check for Understanding: Students music is only complete if it is 2:00 minutes long, includes a pattern or a rythum. 

    Diverse Learners: When assessing student work, allow flexibility within the assesment of students work who may be more familiar with the music from another culture. Understand that they may not see the same patterns within their music, so allow flexiibilty in the length and details of their projects.