Author:
Moira
Subject:
Secondary English Language Arts
Material Type:
Assessment, Lesson, Lesson Plan
Level:
Middle School, High School
Tags:
  • Character Change
  • Character Development
  • Character Types
  • Lesson Plan
  • Novel Study
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Text/HTML

    Education Standards

    Character Changes Lesson and iPad Assignment

    Character Changes Lesson and iPad Assignment

    Overview

    This is a lesson plan is meant to assist in teaching and assessing students' ability to identify character development, types, and changes. This resource can be modified to fit a novel unit study, short stories, or plays. The resource is intended to be used as a digital element in an in-person class but can be modified to fit other class types and modalities.

    Cover image: Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash

    Summary

    This lesson is focused on helping students understand round, flat, static, and dynamic characters as well as identify how a character changes over the course of a novel.

    • This lesson is designed for one 86 minute class period, but it can be altered to fit other class period lengths
    • The lesson is formatted with in-person learning and iPad technology in mind, but can be altered for digital learning and other technology formats

    Background for Teachers

    To teach this lesson, you will need an understanding of the types of characters and of how to identify character development/changes over the course of a novel. You will need a solid understanding of the differences between round, flat, static, and dynamic characters as well as how to explain each character type to a student. The slides attached to Section 5 can assist with teaching the character types.

    Step 1 - Goals and Outcomes

     

    Learning Intentions:

    • Students will be able to identify the different character types independently and explain their reasoning
    • Students will be able to identify how a character changes from the beginning of a narrative to the end of a narrative
    • Students will understand how to visually represent the changes a character goes through

    Success Criteria:

    • Students will be able to explain verbally or in writing how a character has changed
    • Students will be able to explain verbally or in writing why they have identified a character as flat, round, static, dynamic, or a mixture of two of the character types

    Step 2 - Planning Instruction

     

    Student Background Knowledge

    Prior to this lesson, students will need to have an understanding of the characters in the story you have chosen to analyze and an understanding of how to read a text for details about a character. Students should also already know how to use Keynote for iPad (or the equivalent technology available to your class).

    Strategies for Diverse Learners

    This lesson is fairly easy to modify for the needs of diverse learners. A few ideas for scaffolding and modifying for diverse learners include:

    • Descriptive word bank
    • Pre-built slides to work from
    • Small group work
    • Guidance on where to look in the novel/story for change and description 

    Step 3 - Instruction

     

    **This lesson is designed as a mini-lesson followed by an independent student activity that can be accomplished in an 86 minute class period but can be modified to fit longer or shorter class periods.**

    1. Have students complete their start of class procedures and collect their materials for the day
      • Students will need their copy of the class novel or story that is being worked with
      • Students will need their one-to-one technology ready for use
      • Students should pull out any notes they have about the story or novel to assist them
    2. Teach students the types of characters and how change is related to character types
      • Make sure to cover Round, Flat, Static, and Dynamic characters
      • Discuss the ways a character could be changed
      • Discuss how the four character types can combine to create specific roles in a story
      • If you use the attached slide deck, this element of the lesson generally takes about 30-45 minutes (dependent on student questions and understanding)
    3. After establishing the character types, identify the characters that are involved in your story or novel in preparation for the assessment
      • This is a good opportunity to modify for students with diverse learning needs. If a student needs to complete the assessment verbally or if your students need to work in groups the assignment can be removed from technology and moved to the whiteboard as a collaborative assessment.
    4. For assessment of students' ability to identify and present character changes have students create a set of slides that displays the following:
      • Name of the character
      • A visual representation of the character
      • The first slide should have descriptive words that can be used to describe the character (this should be all of the descriptive words regardless of whether they apply to the character's before or after)
      • The second and third slides should separate the descriptive words into the "before" and "after" for the character students are analyzing 
        • If you are using iPads for this assignment have students use the "Magic Move" transition to demonstrate the changes they have identified

     

    Step 4 - Assessments

     

    The main assessment for this assignment is the slide deck created by students to demonstrate how a character has changed over the course of a novel or story. Other assessment opportunities during the lesson include:

    • Discussion responses
    • Elbow-Partner identification of character types
    • Proximity observations of students identifying character development
    • Presentation of character development and character changes in small groups or to the whole class

    A sample rubric for student slide decks and participation is below:

    Score0 - No Evidence1 - Below Proficient2 - Approaching Proficient3 - Proficient4 - Above Proficient
    Slide DeckThe student shows no evidence of completing the slide deck (or alternate assessment) or declined to participate in the activityThe student completed part of the required slide deck but did not complete the required slidesThe student completed their slide deck but may have missed key details related to character development or the way a character changed during the story or novelThe student completed their slide deck and missed few if any of the key details related to character development and character changesThe student completed their slide deck with no missing details and can successfully identify why the change a character goes through matters or how it impacts the story or novel
    Participation and CitizenshipThe student did not participate in the activity and may have been a distraction to other students in the room

    The student participated in part of the activity but stopped participating as soon as they were working individually

    This student might have also been a distraction to other students in the room

    The student participated in the activity and remained on task for most of the class period. This student might have stopped working when they encountered difficulties, but resumed with encouragement.The student participated in the activity and stayed on task for the whole class period. This student kept working when they encountered difficulties with the assignment.

    The student participated in the activity for the whole class period and persisted with the activity when they encountered difficulties.

    This student assisted other students experiencing difficulties with their assignment when possible.