Author:
Katie Blunt
Subject:
Elementary English Language Arts, Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Lower Elementary, Upper Elementary
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Tags:
Goshute, Lesson Plan, Native American, goshute, native-american, november21
License:
Public Domain Dedication
Language:
English
Media Formats:
Text/HTML

Bear and Deer Lesson Plan

Bear and Deer Lesson Plan

Overview

Students will use predicting, questioning, commenting, and connecting to the text as strategies while they read. They will also practice retelling the story to a partner to demonstrate comprehension. This detailed lesson plan is based on the "Bear and Deer" story booklet adapted by Merry Adams; Cultural Consultants: Genevieve Fields and Chrissandra Murphy. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.  
Lesson Plan Author: Patricia Helquist

Summary

Students will use predicting, questioning, commenting, and connecting to the text as strategies while they read. They will also practice retelling the story to a partner to demonstrate comprehension.

  • Time frame: 1 class period of 45 minutes each
  • Group Size: Large Groups
  • Authors: Patricia Helquist
  • Life Skills: Thinking & Reasoning, Communication, Social & Civic Responsibility
  • Materials: "Bear and Deer" for each student (file attached)

Background for Teachers

This story should only be told or read during the winter months.

In the past, the Goshutes held bear dances every spring, but many of the elders who believed in the traditional dances are no longer living. The Goshutes don't practice bear dances anymore, but they have other dances. Some of the other dances are strictly social, and some are to celebrate the coming of new seasons and plants. Some dances are held to ask for moisture to bless Mother Earth.

The Goshute booklet used in this lesson is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The booklet was formatted to be printed and assembled. This means that it does not read well when used electronically because the pages will appear out of order. If a teacher did want to use the booklet in an electronic format, they would be best off screenshotting the pages and arranging them in a slide presentation.

The Native American Literacy Project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.

Step 1 - Goals and Outcomes

Step 1 Goals and Outcomes

Students will be able to identify and use the comprehension strategies of prediction, questioning, commenting, and connecting to text.

Step 3 - Instruction

Step 3 Instruction

See detailed lesson plan (attached file).

Use the attached Probable Passage file (attached) during the lesson.

Step 4 - Assessments

Step 4 Assessments

The students will retell the story to their partner. The teacher will observe to see if comprehension occurred.

Bibliography

"Bear and Deer" adapted by Merry Adams; Cultural Consultants: Genevieve Fields and Chrissandra Murphy