iPad Lesson- Fairy Tale Book

iPad Lesson- Fairy Tale Book

Summary

This lesson is designed for 10th grade Language Arts during a fairy tale unit. Students will analyze children's fairy tales and rewrite one of them from the point of view of the villain with the goal of making you feel bad for the villain and even taking their side.

  • Time frame: Three 90-minute class periods
  • Format: Face-to-face
  • Author: Caitlin Leek

 

Background for Teachers

Educators will need to know how to use Pages on the iPad as well as the book template inside of Pages. Use the resource on Apple Teacher Learning Center to help if you haven't used Pages book templates or if you need a refresher. 

To teach this lesson, you will need an understanding of the basic set up of fairy tales and how children's books are formatted. You and your students will need to know vocab for short stories: setting, characters, theme, and dialogue.

Step 1 - Goals and Outcomes

 

Learning Intentions:

  • Students will be able to understand how fairy tales are formatted.
  • Students will be able to understand how a children's book is formatted.
  • Students will be able to understand changing points of view.

Success Criteria:

  • Students will rewrite a fairy tale from the point of view of the villain in a fairy tale.
  • Students will create a children's book from their fairy tale rewrite using the book template on Pages.

 

Step 2 - Planning Instruction

 

Student Background Knowledge

  • Prior to this lesson, students will need to have an understanding of Reading: Literature Standard 3: Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • Prior to this lesson, we read some Fairy Tales and go over theme and characters. Students will need this background to write their version of a Fairy Tale. We also use this time to go over how children's stories are structured.

Strategies for Diverse Learners

  • Teacher can model an outline of how to change a scene to be fron the villains point-of-view 
  • Teacher can model how to use the book template on Pages
  • Teacher can provide example stories in student's language 
    • if student speaks spanish, there is a spanish version of "The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs" that is from the wolfs point-of-view
  • Teacher can provide written instructions 
    • Pictures can be added to written instructions for lower WIDA levels

Step 3 - Instruction

1. Before introducing the assessment:

Read the "Three Little Pigs" with the students. Any version will work. On the board, list the events that happened. Then, read "The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs" with the students. This story is from the wolf's point of view. Next to the original events on the board, write what the wolf said happened. Talk about what the author did to make you feel bad for the wolf in his version.

2. Story Planning:

Give each student a story planning paper. Have them list in order the events that happened in the story. On the other side, have them write what happened from the villain's point of view. The goal here is to make the reader feel bad for the villain during their series of events. Once the planning is done, have students write out or type out a rough draft of their story.

3. Story Board:

Have students use the story board paper to plan out what part of their story will go on each page and what kind of image they will want to use. 

4. Children's book:

Students will use the book template on Pages to put together their book. They will need to find copyright free images (pixabay is a good option if it's not blocked by your school) or they can draw and upload their own drawings. Once students have their books together, I have them share it with me so I can color print it. You can have them share it in whatever way works best for your classroom. 

 

 

Step 4 - Assessments

 

Formative assessment:

  • Story planning (see Step 3)
  • Story board (see Step 3)

Summatie assessment and rubric

  • Directions:

    Choose one of the fairy tales that we have read. Rewrite the fairy tale from the point of view of the villain. Your goal is to make us feel bad for the villain. You will then make your story into a children’s book by using the book template on Pages.

     

    Steps to complete this project:

  • Use the story planning document to plan out how you will change the story for your villain’s point of view.

  • On a separate sheet of paper, write out your story following your planning.

  • Once you have your story, use the storyboard document to plan out what will be on each page of your story.

  • Open up pages and use the book template to put your story together. Use copyright free images or upload your own drawings to use for your story pictures. 

  • Share your document with your teacher so it can be printed on a color printer.


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    Reading: Literature Standard 3

    Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

    Effectively provides an advanced story of how and why the villain has certain interactions during the fairy tale. Ideas are thoroughly supported with original events and reflect a sophisticated understanding of the fairy tale.

    Effectively provides a story of how and why the villain has certain interactions during the fairy tale. Ideas are well supported and reflect a clear understanding of the fairy tale.

    Provides an story of how and why the villain has certain interactions during the fairy tale. Ideas are supported and reflect a developing understanding of the fairy tale. At times, ideas may lack clarity.

    Does not provide a full story of how and why the villain has certain interactions during the fairy tale. Ideas lack support and reflect a limited understanding of the fairy tale. Ideas may be minimal or unclear. 

    Writing Standard 3

    Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

    Composes a creative and highly-developed narrative. Writer utilizes advanced organizational and idea development strategies to mimic a children’s book.

    Composes a creative and well-developed narrative. Writer utilizes effective organizational and idea development strategies to mimic a children’s book.

    Composes a developing narrative. Writer utilizes basic organizational and idea development strategies. Writing reflects a developing understanding narrative technique and development to mimic a children’s book. At times, details or structure may lack clarity.

    May not compose a developing narrative. Writer may utilize ineffective organizational and idea development strategies. Writing reflects a limited understanding narrative technique and development to mimic a children’s book. Details or structure may be unclear.

    Writing Standard 4

    Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

    Produces clear and coherent writing in which the writer utilizes advanced organizational and idea development strategies. Writing reflects a sophisticated understanding of task, purpose, and audience. 

    Produces clear and coherent writing in which the writer utilizes logical organizational and idea development strategies. Writing reflects a clear understanding of task, purpose, and audience. 

    Produces generally clear writing in which the writer utilizes basic organizational and idea development strategies. Writing reflects a developing understanding of task, purpose, and audience. At times, ideas, organization, or style may lack clarity or consistency. 

    May not produce clear writing. The writer utilizes ineffective organizational or idea development strategies. Writing may reflect a limited understanding of task, purpose, and audience. Ideas, organization, or style may be unclear or inconsistent. 

    Writing Standard 6
    Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

    Effectively and responsibly uses technology to produce and publish writing and interact and collaborate with others. Use of technology reflects a sophisticated understanding of technology’s impact on publication and collaboration. 

    Responsibly uses technology to produce and publish writing and interact and collaborate with others. Use of technology reflects a clear understanding of technology’s impact on publication and collaboration.  

    Attempts to responsibly use technology to produce and publish writing and interact and collaborate with others. Use of technology reflects a basic understanding of technology’s impact on publication and collaboration. 

    May not use technology responsibly to produce or publish writing or to interact or collaborate with others. Use of technology reflects a limited understanding of technology’s impact on publication and collaboration.