Author:
Kellie Janes
Subject:
Elementary Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Lower Elementary
Grade:
2
Tags:
  • 2nd Grade
  • Place Value Lesson Plan
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    Understanding the Value of Numbers

    Understanding the Value of Numbers

    Overview

    This lesson aligns with second grade math core curriculum standard 2.NBT.1.

    Students will understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones.

    Thumbnail: creative commons license. Image from Wiki-How to Teach Place Value

    https://www.wikihow.com/Teach-Place-Value#/Image:Teach-Place-Value-Step-1-Version-2.jpg

    Summary

    Purpose and Vision:

    In this lesson, students will understand that a three-digit number represents amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones.  They will understand that numbers can be bundled in groups of ten tens called a hundred, ten ones called a ten and single units called ones.

    Subject: Math

    Grade Level: 2

    Utah Core Standard: 2.NBT.1
    Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; for example, 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones.

     

    Teacher Resources

    Background Knowledge: 

    Teachers should know and use this academic language and vocabulary:

    1. Digit – Any one of these 10 symbols: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9.

    2. Ones (units) – The name given to the first position from the right when describing whole number place value. In the number 19, 9 is in the ones place. 

    3. Tens (rods) are equal to 10 ones – The name given to the second position from the right when describing whole number place value. In the number 12, 1 is in the tens position.

    4. Hundreds (flats) are equal to 10 tens – The name given to the third position from the right when describing whole number place value. In the number 312, 3 is in the hundreds position.

    5. Place value – The value assigned to the place that a digit occupies in a number.

    6. Place value drawing – A visual representation of groups of tens, as sticks, and individual ones, as circles. It is simply a drawing that represents a number. Hundreds are represented by squares or boxes, tens by vertical lines or ten sticks, and ones by small circles.

           7. Standard form – The name of an number written using digits.

    Strategies for diverse learners:

    This lesson will be taught using a variety of mediums so that students who learn best using a certain medium will understand the content.

    The groups will be made based on ability levels.  Those students who need support will be put in a group with more support, those students who have the skills to work successfully with their peers will be put into groups that recieve less support from the teacher, students who are able to be challenged with to extension learning will be placed in a group to solve more difficult problems. 

    Additional resources:

    https://demmelearning.com/place-value/

    Step 1 - Goals and Outcomes

    Students will be able to understand and explain the value of each digit in a number.

    Students will determine and then explain the value of a digit based on its place in a 3-digit number.

    Step 2 - Planning Instruction

    Prior to this lesson, students should be familiar with the terms: digit, value, ones, tens, hundreds.

    Give a preassessment to determine knowledge of this topic.  Check the preassessment and put the students into groups based on the results.

    Print out the summative and formative assessments.

    Step 3 - Instruction

    Connect to prior knowledge:

    The Pre Assessment will have already been administered prior to the lesson.

    Teacher reviewed the results of the Pre Assessment to determine groups.

    Begin with I can statement: I can determine and then explain the value of a digit based on its place in a 3-digit number. 1 minute

    Review results of Pre Assessment. Use post-its to cover the names of students. Show good examples and non-examples. 

    Introduce and Model New Knowledge:

    Discuss and model vocabulary: 10 minutes. Teacher will use base ten blocks to model and use manipulatives to review math vocabulary. Be sure to use models to represent ones, tens, and hundreds.

    Digit – Any one of these 10 symbols: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9.

    Ones (units) – The name given to the first position from the right when describing whole number place value. In the number 19, 9 is in the ones place.

    Tens (rods) are equal to 10 ones – The name given to the second position from the right when describing whole number place value. In the number 12, 1 is in the tens position.

    Hundreds (flats) are equal to 10 tens – The name given to the third position from the right when describing whole number place value. In the number 312, 3 is in the hundreds positionPlace value – The value assigned to the place that a digit occupies in a number.

    Place value drawing – A visual representation of groups of tens, as sticks, and individual ones, as circles. It is simply a drawing that represents a number. Hundreds are represented by squares or boxes, tens by vertical lines or ten sticks, and ones by small circles. 

    Standard form – The name of a number written using digits.

    Play YouTube and Flocabulary Video: https://www.flocabulary.com/unit/place-value/

    Use this video to illustrate the position of ones tens and hundreds, stop the video and discuss key points. 

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omkDLmfvetk&feature=youtu.be

    Guided Practice:

    Whole Class 15 minutes White Boards - Use white boards with place value mat printed on one side for this lesson.

    Teacher models how to write the number 233 in standard form and students practice writing the number on their white boards.  

    Teacher models how to make the number 233 with base ten blocks. Teacher writes the number 233 using the place value house mat.

    Teacher models how to draw a place value drawing of the number 233. Large squares represent hundreds, ten sticks represent tens, and small squares represent ones. Students practice drawing the number on their white boards.

    Teacher reads aloud the word problem below and teaches the class how to solve it using a place value drawing.

    Ms. Sanchez took 127 pictures at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History and 143 pictures at the Greater Cleveland Aquarium. How many pictures did Ms. Sanchez take in all? 

    Teacher models how to write numbers.

    Using white boards students will draw base ten blocks to show the total number of pictures taken.

    Small Groups Practice: (groups determined by preassessment) see grouping levels below.

    After the discussion, students break into groups to complete place value activities. The teacher works with the struggling group.

    Higher performing group will be assigned to create and solve their own place value word problem. 

    After small group work, whole class reviews all activities.

    Independent Practice:

    Pass out exit ticket (see assessment section) to determine mastery and plan future instruction.

    Small Groups will be determined based on these guidelines:

     

     

     

    DOK Level 1 Group:

    Students working at level 1 are shown base ten blocks. They have to select the correct answer from a multiple choice list.

    DOK Level 2 Group:

    Students working at level 2 are shown base ten blocks and they have to write the 3-digit number that is represented by the base ten blocks.

    DOK Level 3:

    Students working at level 3 will have to solve a word problem. Next, they will have to draw base ten blocks to show the total number. Then, they will have to write the number. Lastly, they will have to explain their drawing to show their thinking.

    Students are expected to work in small groups by collaborating, contributing to the discussion, and staying on task.

     

     

     

     

    Step 4 - Assessments

    Attached are the pre-assessment and exit ticket.  Use the preassessment to determine prior knowledge and place studnets into appropriate groups.

    Formative assessment is the practice activity used during the small group time.

    Summative assessment is the exit ticket 

    Use the exit ticket to show mastery for this lesson.  It will be best to read these assessments to the class for those students who may be challenged with some words

    Rubric attached below: