Author:
David
Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Level:
Middle School
Tags:
  • filmmaking
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
    Language:
    English

    Are we prepared?

    Are we prepared?

    Overview

    Students discover what constitutes a natural disaster, explore the different professions involved with natural disaster response, identify steps they can take to help themselves and others be prepared for natural disasters. Students also learn about filmmaking and create a film to share stories and lessons learned from natural disasters and educate individuals about natural disaster preparedness.

    Emergency Preparedness picture from public domain (https://nara.getarchive.net/media/washington-dc-july-7-2006-a-red-cross-ready-to-go-preparedness-kit-showing-946cb7) 

    Emergency Preparedness and Filmmaking

     

    Title: Are We Prepared? 

    Grade Level: Secondary

    Estimated Time: Ten 45-minute class periods

    Project Summary: Students discover what constitutes a natural disaster, explore the different professions involved with natural disaster response, identify steps they can take to help themselves and others be prepared for natural disasters. Students also learn about filmmaking and create a film to share stories and lessons learned from natural disasters and educate individuals about natural disaster preparedness.

    Driving Question (Teacher Guided, Student Constructed):  How can we educate our community about being prepared for a natural disaster?

     

    Milestone 1: Day 1    Milestone 2: Days 2-5    Milestone 3: Days 6-8    Milestone 4: Day 9

     

    Primary CTE Pathway(s) Explored:

    Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources

       > Natural Resource Science

    Arts, Audio/Visual Technology & Communications

       > Broadcasting & Digital Media

       > Graphic Design & Communication

    Health Science

       > Health Science

    Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security

       > Protective Services

    College and Career Awareness Strand(s) and Standard(s):
    Strand 1: Standard 2

    Strand 1: Standard 3

    Strand 1: Standard 6

    Strand 2: Standard 1

    Strand 2: Standard 2

    Strand 2: Standard 3

    Strand 2: Standard 4

    Strand 2: Standard 5

    Cross-Curricular Integration Suggestions:

    • English Language Arts
    • Science
    • Math
    • Technology
    • Social Studies

     Career Opportunities in the CTE Pathway(s): Emergency Medical Services (Physicians, Nurses, EMTs); First Responders (Fire Fighters, Police Officers); Emergency Management Coordinator; Health Educators; Public Health Management; Homeland Security; Hospital Administration; Geographer; Environmental Scientists; Social Workers; Mental Health Worker; Actor; Camera Operator; Production Assistant; Sound Engineer; Producer; Makeup Artist; Director

     

    Career and Technical Student Organizations (CTSOs): During the PBL experience, look for an opportunity to share how CTSOs promote skill development for associated careers.

    Vocabulary:

    • command center: a facility responsible for disaster management at a strategic level during an emergency
    • disaster relief: money or services made available to individuals and communities that have experienced losses due to disasters
    • drought: a prolonged period of abnormally low rainfall, leading to a shortage of water
    • earthquake: a sudden and violent shaking of the ground, sometimes causing great destruction, as a result of movements within the earth’s crust or volcanic action
    • emergency: a serious, unexpected, and often dangerous situation requiring immediate action
    • emergency kit: a set of items for your essential needs in the event of an emergency or natural disaster
    • family emergency plan: a written set of instructions that outline what individuals should do in an emergency
    • flood: an overflowing of a large amount of water beyond its normal confines, especially over what is normally dry land
    • hurricane: a large tropical storm with high-powered circular winds
    • natural disaster: a natural event such as a flood, earthquake, or hurricane that causes great damage or loss of life
    • tornado: a violently rotating column of air touching the ground, usually attached to the base of a thunderstorm
    • tsunami: a series of waves caused by earthquakes or undersea volcanic eruptions

    Public Products: Students will develop, produce, and present an educational film that will help individuals within their community be better prepared for a natural disaster.

    Background: There exists the potential for natural disasters and emergencies to take place anywhere in the world. These disasters could include earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes, etc. Individuals would like to think that they could plan around when a disaster might take place; however, that is not always the case. It is important for individuals to think about how they can be prepared for when a disaster takes place. Being prepared for a disaster increases the chances that an individual will survive the natural disaster  and remain healthy. As the students are going through this PBL plan, they will have the opportunity to learn about different disasters and what it takes to be prepared for them. Some of these preparations are simple items. The more individuals are aware of simple preparations for surviving a natural disaster, the better the outcome will be. Students will also learn about the filmmaking process by going through the process to produce an educational film about natural disasters and emergency preparedness.

    Additional instructional resources include:

    Milestone 1: Entry Event

    Situation: Natural disasters are frequently occurring around the world. There are peak seasons for different natural disasters. For example, during the winter in the northern Utah mountains, there is an increased risk of avalanche. In the spring, there is an increased chance of floods as snow melts. Wildfires threaten homes in Utah every summer. A major earthquake could occur at any time. Community leaders are concerned that many households are not prepared for a natural disaster and do not know how to respond when a disaster occurs.

    Driving Question (Teacher Guided, Student Constructed): How can we educate our community about being prepared for a natural disaster?

     Key Student Questions:

    • What is a natural disaster?
    • What are different types of natural disasters?
    • How does the geography and location of an area affect the potential of different natural disasters?
    • What are peak times for different natural disasters? 

     

    Formative Assessment:

    • Class discussion

     

    Materials:

    • Computer
    • Access to internet
    • Webcam (if you are using video conferencing)
    • Nepris website
    • Clips of a movie such as Twister or Volcano
    • Local School and/or County Emergency Plan
    • Guest speaker (First Responder or Red Cross)

     

    Day 1 Instructional Procedures:

    1. Choose one of the following options to introduce the students to the importance of emergency preparedness:
    • Conduct a Nepris virtual chat with an expert in emergency preparedness.
    • Show clips of a movie such as Twister or Volcano and discuss ways in which individuals respond during a disaster and how they can improve upon their response. (This is also a great activity to do at the end of the unit as a review or to check for understanding.
    • Evaluate the emergency plan for the school and/or county. Have the students identify different locations that could potentially experience different disasters.
    • Invite a First Responder to visit the class and talk about different types of emergencies. If an individual from the Red Cross is available to come in to talk about the disaster and how they assist with the aftermath that is also a great idea.
    1. Explain to the students that natural disasters are frequently occurring around the world. There are peak seasons for different natural disasters. For example, during the winter in the northern Utah mountains, there is an increased risk of avalanche. In the spring, there is an increased chance of floods as snow melts. Wildfires threaten homes in Utah every summer. A major earthquake could occur at any time. Community leaders are concerned that many households are not prepared for a natural disaster and do not know how to respond when a disaster occurs.
    2. Have the students who have been involved in a natural disaster share their experiences with the class. If no one in the class has experienced a natural disaster, students could share stories of a family member or close friend. For example, in 2020 Magna, Utah and surrounding areas experienced mild earthquakes. Ask questions similar to the following:
    • What happened?  
    • How did you feel?
    • How did it change your life?
    • How can you feel more ready for another earthquake?
    1. Guide the students to construct a question similar to, “How can we educate our community about being prepared for a natural disaster?”
    2. Explain to the students that they will work in teams to research, develop, produce, and present an education tool that will help individuals within their community be better prepared for a natural disaster.

    Milestone 2: Research

    Driving Question (Teacher Guided, Student Constructed): How can we educate our community about being prepared for a natural disaster?

     Key Student Questions:

    • What is a Family Emergency Plan?
    • What does it mean to be prepared for a disaster?
    • What should a home safety checklist include?
    • What supplies should households have in order to be prepared?
    • What items should be included in an emergency kit?
    • What basic first aid skills would be helpful to know in the event of a natural disaster?

     

    Formative Assessments:

     Materials:

    • Selected clips from the following videos

     

    Day 2 Instructional Procedures:

    1. Ask the students, “What is a natural disaster?”
    2. After listening to their answers, view a variety of selected clips from the following videos about natural disasters:
    1. Organize the class into teams of five students who will work together throughout the project.
    2. Provide each student with a copy of the What is a Natural Disaster? activity sheet. Have the students work together in their teams to research the information and complete the activity sheet.

     

    Day 3 Instructional Procedures:

    1. Ask the students, “What does it mean to be prepared?”
    2. After listening to their answers, have the teams look at and discuss the information about Family Emergency Plans from the ready.gov website.
    3. Lead a discussion about the importance of Family Emergency Plans. Use the following questions and points to guide the discussion:
    • What is a Family Emergency Plan?
    • How can you develop a Family Emergency Plan?
    • What does a Family Emergency Plan include?
    • It is important to have a contact number of a family member or friend that resides in a different region or state.
    • It is important to include a meeting place in your Family Emergency Plan.
    1. In teams, have students review and discuss the CDC’s home preparedness recommendations for different natural disasters on the Natural Disasters and Severe Weather webpage.
    2. As a class, discuss the importance of preparing homes for natural disasters. Use the following points to guide the discussion:
    • Homes should be inspected for possible hazards before a natural disaster occurs (secure appliances and heavy furniture; keep hazardous materials in a well-ventilated area away from water storage, children, and pets; anchor fuel tanks).
    • Family members should know how to shut off utilities (gas, water, and electric) at the main switches or valves.
    • The home’s structure and foundation should be inspected after a natural disaster.
    • Homes should have a fire extinguisher and family members should know its location and how to use it.
    • Homes should have smoke detectors and a battery-operated carbon monoxide  detector.
    1. In teams, have the students create a home safety checklist.
    2. As a homework assignment, ask the students to work with their families to complete a Family Emergency Plan and the home safety checklist they created with their groups.

    Day 4 Instructional Procedures:

    1. Discuss the importance of preparing essential survival items for the home and items that can be grabbed quickly in the case of evacuation. Discuss the difference between needs and wants in emergency situations.
    2. Create five groups that include one person from each team. Assign each group one of the following topics to research:
    1. Reassign students back into their teams and have each member share what they learned about their topic.
    2. Have each team develop a checklist of survival items they will need for two weeks. For an extra challenge, have the teams determine the cost of the supplies.

     

    Day 5 Instructional Procedures:

    1. Invite an EMT or First Responder to visit the class to discuss and provide instruction on basic first aid skills and precautions (bloodborne pathogens, airborne pathogens) that would be helpful in the event of a natural disaster. If an expert is not available to visit the classroom, refer to the Save a Life website for information on first aid basics.
    2. Discuss reasons why it may take time for First Responders to arrive in the event of a natural disaster.
    • Increased number of people needing assistance at the same time.
    • Communication systems may be down or overloaded.
    • Roads may be impassable.
    • Some first responders may be victims themselves.
    1. Explore basic first aid skills for the following:
    • Simple cuts
    • Deep cuts
    • Stabilizing a broken bone
    • Precautions to take when moving individuals
    • Evaluating the surrounding areas to make sure it is safe to enter
    • Precautions to take with head injuries

    Milestone 3: Planning and Design

    Driving Question (Teacher Guided, Student Constructed): How can we educate our community about being prepared for a natural disaster?

     Key Student Questions:

    • What do people need to know to be prepared for the disaster we chose?
    • What should we include in our film to the community?
    • What is an effective way to present our message?

    Formative Assessments:

    • Emergency Planning activity sheet

     Materials:

     

     

    Days 6-8 Instructional Procedures:

    1. Explain to the teams that they will be choosing a natural disaster that has the potential of occuring in Utah. They will develop a film to educate their community about being prepared for this disaster.
    2. Provide each team with an Emergency Planning activity sheet. Direct the teams to complete the items for the disaster they chose and add other information that will help people be prepared for the disaster.
    3. Instruct the teams to determine what type of film they will produce (short story, documentary, public service announcement, or animation.
    4. Using the information from their planning sheets, teams should create a script and storyboard for their film.
    1. Script Tools: Google Docs, Final Draft, Celtx
    2. Storyboard Tools: Storyboard That, Comic Life, Canva, Google Slides
    1. Each team should share their script with another team.
    2. Each team will assign roles and begin filming.
    3. Each team will learn about copyright and citing sources (Nearpod Lesson).
    4. Students will learn the basics of editing techniques and how to use iMovie to edit their film.
    5. Students will produce their film and share it with an authentic audience.
    6. Reviewers will use the Audience Feedback Form to critique the films. Provide students with instruction concerning how to constructively critique each other’s work, which is essentially a work in progress. Remind students that feedback should be kind, helpful, and specific.
    7. Provide time for the students to revise their films based on the feedback they received.

    Milestone 4: Final Film

    Driving Question (Teacher Guided, Student Constructed): How can we create a film to educate our community about being prepared for a natural disaster?

     Key Student Questions:

    • How can we share our film to present our message and answer questions about it?
    • How can we keep our film interesting and keep the attention of the audience?

     

    Summative Assessment:

    • Final film

    Materials:

     

     

    Day 9 Instructional Procedures - Film festival*:

    1. Prior to Day 9, invite guests to view films and provide feedback to the teams. Audience members could include First Responders, community members (i.e., fire fighters, government officials, police officers, American Red Cross workers, local health administration, etc.) family members, or school administration.
    2. Provide each guest with one copy of the Audience Rubric per film they will view.
    3. Each team will present their film and answer questions.
    4. All students should complete a Peer Collaboration Evaluation. (Use this template and instructions to create a Peer Collaboration Evaluation Google Form customized to your class.)

     

    Author(s): David Martini

                    Modified for adding filmmaking by David Hales