Updating search results...

Search Resources

63 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • native-american
Book: Handsome Coyote and Wildcat: A Tale from the Northwestern Band of Shoshone
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

According to Shoshone tradition, Coyote tales should only be told during the winter time. Instead of using the "lecture" method of teaching morals and life lessons, Shoshone parents use tales such as "Handsome Coyote and Wildcat" to teach their children that there are consequences for their actions. This Shoshone story booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
Jr.
Brenda Beyal
Don Mose
Theresa Breznau
Wallace Zundel
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: Honeeshgish: A Navajo Legend
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

The Honeeshgish, or fire poker, is sacred to traditional Navajo. They believe that the Holy People blessed it and gave it to the Diné to use in their fireplaces, their homes, and their ceremonies. This Navajo booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
Jr.
Don Mose
Molly Trainor
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: How Badger, Skunk and Sage Hen Were Marked: A Paiute Tale (Paiute Tribe of Utah)
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

This Paiute booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
Leeann Parker
Molly Trainor
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: How Beaver Lost the Fur on His Tail:  A Paiute Tale (Paiute Tribe of Utah)
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

Tookwee’nup, legends, are Paiute stories told during the winter months. They are mythical, often humorous, and they contain a moral. Tookwee’nup teach Paiute children why things are like they are. The stories give spiritual instruction and expose the children to human characteristics that we all possess. This Paiute booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
Leeann Parker
Molly Trainor
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: How Wood Tick Became Flat: A Tale from the Northwestern Band of Shoshone
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

To the Shoshone, the elders are their teachers, and the words of the elders are important truths for them. The elders have lived long lives, and their stories guide and protect the Shoshone. This Shoshone booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
Jr.
Amy Hootchew Timtimboo
Brenda Beyal
Don Mose
Theresa Breznau
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: Legend of the Sleeping Ute: A Ute Mountain Ute Tale
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

The Ute Mountain Ute people live in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado, near the base of Wisuv Káruv, or Sleeping Ute Mountain. The Ute Mountain Ute tribal headquarters are located at Towaoc, Colorado. The Ute Mountain Ute Sun Dance is held there every year on Sleeping Ute Mountain. This Ute Mountain Ute booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
Curtis Yanito
Merry M. Palmer
Russell Lopez
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: Ms. Coyote and Doe: A Navajo Tale
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

According to Navajo tradition, this is a winter tale. Coyote stories should only be told in the winter time. This Navajo story booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The full set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This means that they do not read well when using a projector or smart board because the pages will appear out of order. If a teacher did want to use the books in an electronic format, they would be best off screenshotting the pages and arranging them in a slide presentation.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
Jr.
Don Mose
Molly Trainor
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: Owl and Woodpecker: A Navajo Tale
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

To the Navajo, the owl is a bearer of bad news. When an owl appears, it may be a warning that something terrible is about to happen. When a traditional Navajo sees an owl, he prays for intervention, protection, and guidance. This Navajo booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The full set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This means that they do not read well when using a projector or smart board because the pages will appear out of order. If a teacher did want to use the books in an electronic format, they would be best off screenshotting the pages and arranging them in a slide presentation.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
Jr.
Don Mose
Molly Trainor
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: The Creator and Coyote: A Ute Mountain Ute Tale
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

Coyote is a trickster. He tries to trick the people, but they already know what he is capable of doing and how far he will go to get his way. He has a bag full of tricks. This story should only be told during the winter months. This Ute Mountain Ute story booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
Curtis Yanito
Merry M. Palmer
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: The Eye Juggler Coyote: A Uintah/Ouray Ute Tale
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

When the earth was new, there were no people, only the animals. The animals had human characteristics, and they were able to speak to one another. Coyote was often the trickster and had to learn the hard way. The Ute people tell stories about Coyote and other animals to their children. Based on Coyote's mistakes, the elders teach children about proper behavior and positive attitudes. The lessons learned help them avoid making the same mistakes Coyote did and suffering the consequences in their own lives. This Ute(Uintah/Ouray) story booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
LeeAnn Parker
Molly Trainor
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: The Greedy Porcupine: A Tale from the Northwestern Band of Shoshone
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

According to Shoshone culture, everyone should be proud of who he or she is, not envious of others. Everyone should also be grateful for what they have and avoid complaining. Everyone is given special gifts and talents, which should be used appropriately. If talents are misused, they could be taken away.
This Shoshone booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
Jr.
Brenda Beyal
Don Mose
Patty Timbimboo-Madsen
Theresa Breznau
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: Why Buzzard Is a Loner: A Uintah/Ouray Ute Tale
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

Just as the birds in this story held a council meeting to decide how to deal with Buzzard, Ute people, to this day, have council meetings to discuss problems and solutions for their people. At these meetings, everyone has the right to express his or her opinion and be heard and listened to. Although some Native American Indian stories can only be told during the winter time, this story can be told any time of the year. This Ute (Uintah/Ouray) booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
LeeAnn Parker
Molly Trainor
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Book: Why the North Star Stands Still:  A Paiute Tale (Paiute Tribe of Utah)
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

Tookwee’nup are Paiute legends or stories told during the winter months. They are mythical and humorous, and they often contain a moral. A Paiute elder explained, "The most important purpose of Tookwee’nup is to teach children to laugh at themselves. When a child falls and cries, the parent's laughter turns the child's tears into joy. Thus, when the child becomes an adult, he then has the ability to take calamity in stride." This Paiute booklet is part of the Native American Indian Literacy Project storybook series for the six main Utah Tribal Nations. The project was led by Shirlee A. Silversmith, American Indian education specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. There are five stories per Tribe, with a total of 30 booklets, plus an ABC book. The set of Indian Tribal stories may be utilized by elementary classroom teachers to (1) develop an understanding and appreciation of Native American culture and societal contributions (2) provide a genre of text for the application of reading strategies, and (3) facilitate the mastery of various Utah Core Content Curriculum objectives. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.
The original set has 30 booklets, measuring 5.5” x 8.5” each, and illustrated by tribal members. The booklets were formatted to be printed and assembled. This version of the book has been updated to accommodate using a projector or smart board with pages appearing in order.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Utah State Board of Education
Author:
Leeann Parker
Molly Trainor
Date Added:
11/09/2021
Cottontail Tames Wood, Water, and Rock
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson shares a Ute tale with students to help them to use illustrations to help clarify text details and sequence. The story is then used to help engage students in a discussion on bullying, how actions have consequences and what the characteristics are of a good friend.Background information gives teachers resources to help their students learn more about the Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah and Ouray Reservation. The lesson is an integrated English Language Arts, Social Studies, Health lesson. 

Subject:
Elementary English Language Arts
Health Education
Literature
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson
Reading
Author:
Brenda Beyal
Lorna Loy
Date Added:
03/22/2022
Coyote Loses His Eyes
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

According to Goshute and Ute tradition, Coyote tales should only be told during the winter time. The tribes ask that the teacher use this lesson and story in the winter months. This lesson utilizes the Confederated Tribes of the Goshute (CTGR) tale, “Coyote Loses His Eyes” and the Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah and Ouray Reservation (UIT) tale, “The Eye Juggler Coyote” to enhance comprehension skills and provide an introduction to comparing and contrasting plot, characters, theme and setting. The students will also be introduced to similarities and differences between the two tribes. Lastly, students will write a response summarizing using compare and contrast key words.Native peoples tell stories about Coyote and other animals to their children. Based on Coyote’s mistakes, the elders teach children about proper behavior and positive attitudes. The lessons taught help children to avoid making the same mistakes as Coyote and suffering the consequences in their own lives. 

Subject:
Dance
Elementary English Language Arts
Health Education
History
Literature
Social Studies
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Author:
Brenda Beyal
Lorna Loy
Date Added:
03/22/2022
Coyote Loses His Eyes Lesson Plan
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

This is the detailed lesson plan. Students will be guided through the strategies included in reciprocal teaching as they read/listen to the Goshute tale "Coyote Loses His Eyes." based on the Goshute story booklet adapted by Kathryn Hurst and Cultural Consultants Genevieve Fields and Chrissandra Murphy. This story should only read told or read during the winter months. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.Lesson Plan Author: Patricia Helquist

Subject:
Elementary English Language Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Katie Blunt
Date Added:
11/08/2021
Coyote Steals Fire
Rating
0.0 stars

Learn about the history and culture of the Northwestern Shoshone people. Paint a watercolor landscape of an environment with Utah wildlife.
This lesson is written in partnership with and approved by the Northwestern Shoshone cultural specialist Patty Timbimboo-Madsen. Northwestern Band of Shoshone SealBefore teaching this lesson, please explain to your students that there are many native tribes in the United States and that this lesson specifically focuses on the northwestern band of the Shoshone Nation and does not represent other Native American groups. We hope that other native tribes will respect the northwestern band of the Shoshone Nation's choice to share this aspect of their culture.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Rachel Jackson
Date Added:
10/28/2022
Coyote and Duck: A Paiute Tale
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Coyote tales are part of the Paiute oral tradition used to teach proper behavior and values from an early age. These stories are only told during the winter time. The Coyote illustrates the mischievous nature in all of us. This lesson the Paiute tale, Coyote and Duck to enhance comprehension and prediction skills of students. It also helps students become familiar with cultural storytelling and its importance in Native cultures. Students will have a brief introduction to the Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah (PITU) and its location in Utah. The lesson includes a discussion about Native American regalia and explicitly addresses stereotypes. 

Subject:
Dance
Elementary English Language Arts
English Language Arts
History
Literature
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Author:
Lorna Loy
Brenda Beyal
Date Added:
03/23/2022
Coyote and Frog Race  Lesson Plan
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

This is the detailed lesson plan to create a story map based on the "Coyote and Frog Race" Goshute story booklet adapted by LeeAnn Parker and Cultural Consultants Genevieve Fields and Chrissandra Murphy. This story should only read told or read during the winter months. The Native American Indian Literacy Project was made possible by funds from the Utah State Office of Education (USOE). It is a joint effort of the USOE and San Juan School District Media Center.Lesson Plan Author: Patricia Helquist

Subject:
Elementary English Language Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Katie Blunt
Date Added:
11/08/2021