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The 4-Point Backyard Diurnal Parallax Method
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On field, students have to image a given asteroid on two consecutive nights, producing two sets of images obtained over 10-15 minutes, each set separated by about 4-5 hours. In class, students have to process the images in order to measure the observed diurnal parallax and then determine the corresponding asteroid distance.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Eduardo Manuel Alvarez
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Astronomy Snakes & Ladders Game
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
Rating

The classic snakes and ladders game is replaced by rockets and comets in this astronomy themed version. The game is challenging and interactive way to learn various astronomical topics while moving your way to the winning square as space travellers.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Game
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Avivah Yamani
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Blue Marble Floating in Empty Space
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Using photographs and models, students are taken on a virtual journey to outer space. They can look back at the Earth as they travel further away and see it growing increasingly smaller, giving the experience that we live on a tiny planet that floats in a vast and empty space.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Erik Arends
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Children's Planetary Maps: Io
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Using planetary maps, students will be able to read cartographic information and compare the environmental conditions of Io to those Earth. They will understand the conditions needed for life to exist, and be able to explain why it cannot exist on Io.

Subject:
Science
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Henrik Hargitai
Mátyás Gede
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Children's Planetary Maps: Mars
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Using planetary maps, students will be able to read cartographic information and compare the environmental conditions of Mars to those Earth. They will understand the conditions needed for life to exist, and be able to explain why it cannot exist on Mars.

Subject:
Science
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Henrik Hargitai
Mátyás Gede
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Children's Planetary Maps: Pluto & Charon
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Using planetary maps, students will be able to read cartographic information and compare the environmental conditions of Pluto/Charon to those Earth. They will understand the conditions needed for life to exist, and be able to explain why it cannot exist on Pluto or Charon.

Subject:
Science
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Henrik Hargitai
Mátyás Gede
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Children's Planetary Maps: The Moon
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Using planetary maps, students will be able to read cartographic information and compare the environmental conditions of The Moon to those Earth. They will understand the conditions needed for life to exist, and be able to explain why it cannot exist on The Moon.

Subject:
Science
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Henrik Hargitai
Mátyás Gede
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Children's Planetary Maps: Titan
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Using planetary maps, students will be able to read cartographic information and compare the environmental conditions of Titan to those Earth. They will understand the conditions needed for life to exist, and be able to explain why it cannot exist on Titan.

Subject:
Science
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Henrik Hargitai
Mátyás Gede
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Children's Planetary Maps: Venus
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Using planetary maps, students will be able to read cartographic information and compare the environmental conditions of Venus to those Earth. They will understand the conditions needed for life to exist, and be able to explain why it cannot exist on Venus.

Subject:
Science
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Henrik Hargitai
Mátyás Gede
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Coma Cluster of Galaxies
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This classroom activity for high school students uses a collection of Hubble Space Telescope images of galaxies in the Coma Cluster. Students study galaxy classification and the evolution of galaxies in dense clustered environments.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Keely Finkelstein, McDonald Observatory
Date Added:
06/24/2014
Counting Sunspots
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Using solar images and date obtained from Astronomical Observatory of the University of Coimbra lets you study the sunspots and their behaviour over days.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Game
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Joao Fernandes, University of Coimbra
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Country Movers – Visualizing Spatial Scales in Planetary and Earth Sciences
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Students learn about local and planetary physical geography / geology, toponymy, planetary landing site selection and cartography. The students learn a complex process of landscape evaluation and city planning, based on the interpretation of photomaps or digital terrain models.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Henrik Hargitai
Mátyás Gede
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Create Your Own Astro-Music
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

In this activity, students learn about astronomical phenomena we can see in the universe and create their own music inspired by astronomical images. By performing original musical improvisations, students enhance their knowledge of what astronomical phenomena are represented in images and experiment with creative ways of representing these using music. This activity engages students in first hand exploration of music and astronomy connections.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Matthew Whitehouse
Date Added:
12/09/2016
Creating Asteroids
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

In this activity, students familiarise themselves with asteroids. They discuss and build their own model asteroids. They learn how asteroids are formed in the Solar System. At the end of the activity, each student has their own model asteroid made from clay.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Angela Perez
Tibisay Sankatsing Nava
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Deadly Moons
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

From Earth’s moon to Europa, our solar system is filled with interesting set of natural satellites. Through art and science, children learn about moons of our solar system with the Deadly Moons activity.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Deirdre Kelleghan
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Design Your Alien
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Review the environmental factors that make the Earth habitable and compare them to other worlds within our Solar System. Use creative thinking to design an alien life form suited for specific environmental conditions on an extra-terrestrial world within our Solar System.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Game
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Sarah Roberts
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Double Take
Read the Fine Print
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Based only on what we see when we watch stars in the sky, it’s easy to believe that the stars revolve around a stationary Earth, a common misconception among children. Although many students have at least heard that the Earth spins, they may not have thought about how this affects how we see stars, planets and the Moon.

In this activity, students find evidence of the Earth’s spinning through observing the apparent movement of stars. They use outstretched arms to measure the distance between a star and an object at the horizon. Later, they return to the same spot, re-measure, and notice that the star is in a different position, and try to explain this movement. Finally, the instructor shares the accepted scientific explanation for the phenomenon.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Beetles: Science and Teaching for Field Instructors
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Earth Science Concepts for High School (Student's Edition)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

CK-12 Earth Science For High School covers the study of Earth - its minerals and energy resources, processes inside and on its surface, its past, water, weather and climate, the environment and human actions, and astronomy.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Textbook
Provider:
CK-12 Foundation
Provider Set:
CK-12 FlexBook
Author:
Desonie, Dana
Date Added:
09/30/2010
Earth Science for Middle School (Student's Edition)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

CK-12 Earth Science For Middle School covers the study of Earth - its minerals and energy resources, processes inside and on its surface, its past, water, weather and climate, the environment and human actions, and astronomy.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Textbook
Provider:
CK-12 Foundation
Provider Set:
CK-12 FlexBook
Author:
Brainard, Jean
Sandeen, Julie
Date Added:
08/22/2010
Earth, Sun, Moon, and Beyond
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

Students will explore the relationships and patterns among the Earth, Sun, and Moon system in our solar system. Students will design, build, and test a model of a lunar rover.

Subject:
Science
Astronomy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
South Metro-Salem STEM Partnership
Author:
Krista McIntosh
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Evening Sky Watching for Students
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Nursery (or Kindergarten or Preschool) students enjoy seeing the evening sky with the teacher from the playground or through a big window (indoor). This is especially relevant for students who stay for extra-hour care. During late evening hours, some students feel a little lonely waiting for their parents, but they have a wonderful natural treasure: the evening sky. By observing the evening sky with the naked eye, they will notice many colours, changing colours, the first star, the subtle colours of stars, twinkling stars, and the movement of stars. Nursery teachers who think they are not science-oriented will also gain guidance skills of introducing science to students. This activity is also useful for primary school students, especially younger-grade students.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Akihiko Tomita
Date Added:
01/01/2016
The Fibre Optic Cable Class
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This activity is an interactive “out-of-the-seat” demo that allows the students to become involved in learning about fibre optic cables by imitating the way that one basically functions. While enjoying the physicality of the demo the children will pick up basic details of light, reflection, optical properties, and applications to technology. Additionally, the activity will go into details of how fibre optics are used in astronomy technology and how it is used to improve our understanding of the universe. An emphasis should be placed on asking direct questions to the children about how these concepts can influence technology, astronomy, and our world to reinforce the concepts that they are learning about.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Amee Hennig
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Galaxies and Dark Matter
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This video lesson has the goal of introducing students to galaxies as large collections of gravitationally bound stars. It explores the amount of matter needed for a star to remain bound and then brings in the idea of Dark Matter, a new kind of matter that does not interact with light. It is best if students have had some high school level mechanics, ideally Newton's laws, orbital motion and centripetal force. The teacher guide segment has a derivation of centripetal acceleration. This lesson should be mostly accessible to students with no physics background. The video portion of this lesson runs about 30 minutes, and the questions and demonstrations will give a total activity time of about an hour if the materials are all at hand and the students work quickly. However, 1 1/2 hours is a more comfortable amount of time. There are several demonstrations that can be carried out using string, ten or so balls of a few inches in diameter, a stopwatch or clock with a sweep second hand and some tape. The demonstrations are best done outside, but can also be carried out in a gymnasium or other large room. If the materials or space are not available, there are videos of the demonstrations in the module and these may be used.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Peter Fisher
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Glitter Your Milky Way
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Have you ever wondered where we are in our own galaxy, Milky Way? "Glitter Your Milky Way" let you get creative while learning the characteristics of the Milky Way and exploring the types of galaxies.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Kathleen Horner, Astronomers Without Borders
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Globe at Night Activity Guide
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Students participate in a global campaign to observe and record the faintest visible stars as a means of measuring light pollution in a given location. By locating and observing the constellation Orion in the night sky and comparing it to stellar charts, students from around the world will learn how the artificial lighting in their community contribute to light pollution. Student contributions to the online database will document the visible night time sky.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Amee Hennig
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Gravity and Orbits (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Move the sun, earth, moon and space station to see how it affects their gravitational forces and orbital paths. Visualize the sizes and distances between different heavenly bodies, and turn off gravity to see what would happen without it!

Subject:
Astronomy
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Chris Malley
Emily Moore
John Blanco
Jon Olson
Kathy Perkins
Noah Podolefsky
Patricia Loblein
Sam Reid
Date Added:
02/07/2011
How Big & How Far
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The sizes and distances of things in space are awe-inspiring, but hard to fathom. Things that are unimaginably massive can look tiny to us from Earth, and things that appear very large to us may be among the smallest in the sky. Although students can learn names and features of objects in the night sky, scale is one of the biggest stumbling blocks they need to overcome to actually understand what they’re looking at and to understand astronomy in general. But students have lots of daily life experience with bigger things looking smaller because of relative distance (and visa versa). How Big & How Far takes this experience of observing relative sizes and distances here on Earth and challenges students to apply it to night sky objects.

In this Night Sky Activity, the group measures how many fists tall a volunteer is. Then, students scatter and measure again, this time with outstretched fists and with much smaller and varied measurements. Students discuss how the distance you are from an object can make it appear larger or smaller. This activity sets them up to apply this idea afterwards as they observe night sky objects and attempt to better understand the actual sizes of the objects they see.

Subject:
Astronomy
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Beetles: Science and Teaching for Field Instructors
Date Added:
12/10/2020
How High is the Sky?
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This activity aims to teach students about the different layers of the atmosphere. It also aims to teach them which part of our atmosphere is considered outer space and what phenomena occur in each layer.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Rogel Mari Sese, Regulus Space Tech
Date Added:
12/10/2020
How Light Pollution Affects the Stars: Magnitude Readers
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
Rating

Light pollution affects the visibility of stars. Building a simple Magnitude Reader, students determine the magnitude of stars and learn about limiting magnitude.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Amee Hennig
Date Added:
12/10/2020
How Many Stars Can You See at Night?
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Students will study through investigation the effects of light pollution on night sky observation. They will share their results and suggest improvement within the community.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Jose Goncalves, Nucleo Interativo de Astronomia; Franziska Zaunig, Cardiff University
Date Added:
12/10/2020
How To Travel on Earth Without Getting Lost
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

With this activity, students use a globe to learn how a position on Earth can be described. They investigate how latitude can be found using the stars. Students learn what latitude and longitude are and how to use them to indicate a position on Earth. They investigate how in some locations on Earth, the direction of the midday sun can change over the year.

Subject:
Astronomy
Geography
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Leiden Observatory
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Impact Craters
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

The students will learn about recent meteor strikes and the effects they can have. They will then examine their significance in the history of the planet, and what they do to the surface of a planet when forming a crater. The students will then experimentally determine how the size and impact velocity of a meteorite determine the size of the crater.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Christian Eistrup
Ronan Smith
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Let's Break the Particles
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This is a hands-on activity to learn that energy can be transformed into various forms. Potential energy is converted into kinetic energy. Moreover, this kinetic energy can be used (if more than the relative binding energy) to break atoms, particles and molecules to see “inside” and to study their constituents.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Sandro Bardelli, INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna; Amalia Persico, Sofos-Divulgazione delle Scienze
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Lunar Day
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Two children act as the Moon and the Earth. By holding hands and spinning around they mimic the tidal locking of the Moon. They note that the Moon always keeps the same face towards Earth.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Sethanne Howard, US Naval Observatory
Date Added:
12/10/2020
Lunar Lander
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Can you avoid the boulder field and land safely, just before your fuel runs out, as Neil Armstrong did in 1969? Our version of this classic video game accurately simulates the real motion of the lunar lander with the correct mass, thrust, fuel consumption rate, and lunar gravity. The real lunar lander is very hard to control.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Michael Dubson
Date Added:
01/26/2007